Shares of Caesars fall sharply as debt talks fail

Shares of Caesars Entertainment fell $2.05, or 17 percent on Monday to close at $10. The casino operator said the company’s bankrupt operating division, Caesars Entertainment Operating Co., has been unable to reach a deal regarding the restructuring plan to cut “some” debt, Reuters reported.

Common Core testing resumes; problems persist

Nevada schools on Monday resumed statewide testing of students in grades three to eight following computer server crashes that interrupted the process last week. About 27,000 students started testing without interruption on Monday morning, according to the Nevada Department of Education, though the system later generated error messages at some schools across the state.

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News

Sports

Rebels’ football depth chart a work in progress

First-year UNLV football coach Tony Sanchez released his post-spring depth chart Monday. He expects it to change considerably by the time the Rebels kick off the season Sept. 5 at Northern Illinois.

Entertainment

iHeartMedia announces Summer Pool Party

Music is the blood sport of youth, so it’s fitting that iHeartMedia on Monday announced a Caesars Palace Summer Pool Party featuring singers children can get behind.

Business

Shares of Caesars fall sharply as debt talks fail

Shares of Caesars Entertainment fell $2.05, or 17 percent on Monday to close at $10. The casino operator said the company’s bankrupt operating division, Caesars Entertainment Operating Co., has been unable to reach a deal regarding the restructuring plan to cut “some” debt, Reuters reported.

Nation and World

Opinion

EDITORIAL: End lawmakers’ lobby hobby

Election to Congress is a golden ticket, essentially a guarantee of lifetime job security in Washington. The more former lawmakers we have, the more lobbyists we get, and the more lobbyists we have, the more spending we get. Breaking this vicious, costly cycle will take more than electing a genuine fiscal conservative as president. No, to dial back the size of Washington, we have to shut the revolving door forever. And one freshman lawmaker has an idea to do just that.

Life

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