DJ Sunnery James, performing at Marquee, ready to score some goals


For months, I have been trying to talk famous DJ-producers into playing a soccer match this summer at Las Vegas’ Electric Daisy Carnival.

After all, European DJs grow up playing soccer. Even American DJs have soccer exposure now.

And Dutch DJ Sunnery James thinks this is a stellar idea.

“We need to set it up. I think it will be a big event,” James says.

“I will put a tweet out to all the guys and see how they react and see if we can do it,” James says.

(He still hasn’t tweeted this, as far as I can tell, so I hope he’s not humoring me.)

There is a precedent for a DJ soccer match. Last year, James and 13 DJ buddies played a charity game at Miami’s Winter Music Conference, with the Dutch DJs (Afrojack, etc.) beating the Swedes (Sebastian Ingrosso, etc.) by a score of 13-11.

And James — who performs Saturday at club Marquee with his DJ partner Ryan Marciano —was a high-level soccer player before he switched to DJing/producing. So this idea is up his alley.

“We could set it up again — maybe a (soccer) video game with more players and a real game. It will be fun for the Dutch guys, because we will win for sure,” he says and laughs.

Who are the best soccer players among DJs?

“It’s hard to tell,” James says. “The only guys who I know who play soccer are the Dutch guys, and I mean, wow, I think Tiesto was a real rounder in the football game” in Miami last year.

“And my partner Ryan Marciano, of course — he is a good football player, so if I had to choose one, I would pick him.”

James’ soccer background gives him something in common with Redfoo, the DJ and sometime-half of LMFAO. Redfoo told me he came up with his “shuffling” dance moves by integrating childhood soccer steps into it.

James says his wild dance steps in nightclubs are also soccer related.

“When I scored a goal before, I would make these crazy moves. And I still make these crazy moves in the DJ booth,” he says.

“When I see YouTube videos of me in the DJ booth, I go, ‘Wow, what am I doing?’ ”

James is raising a young child with his wife, model Doutzen Kroes.

Will James make his son play soccer when he grows up?

“I hope so. I was playing soccer before at a certain level. I didn’t make it, but if he wants to go that way, I will support him fully,” James says.

“That’s the dream of every father, especially a father from Holland, where soccer, or football, is the number one thing.”

As James thinks about his son playing soccer, he gets more and more excited.

“I will make time and be there for him, because that would be a dream if he wants to do that.”

However, then James starts to calm his fatherly instincts.

“But I will never push him or force him to do something, because that will never work.

“With music, I will show him some stuff,” James says. “Then he has to choose by himself. I have to guide him. That’s the only point of being a good dad.”

This is true.

Doug Elfman’s column appears on Page 3A in the main section on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. He also writes for Neon on Fridays. Email him at delfman@reviewjournal.com. He blogs at reviewjournal.com/elfman.