Healthy food fires up fitness fanatic


I asked NBC’s celebrity fitness hard-ass Jillian Michaels what she would do if she were elected president of the United States. Guess what. She has answers.

“Great question, I love it!” Michaels says. (She is in Vegas on Saturday for her two-hour motivational show called “Maximize Your Life” at the Cox Pavilion.)

“First thing I would do is I would start shifting the subsidy dollars over to small, local farmers. And I would have (that money) go toward veggies and fruits, and dairy and meat — so healthy food would be more affordable.

“Second thing I would do, I would require all government organizations like hospitals, schools and military bases to get a certain percentage of their food from a local farm, so we could start to decentralize the food system.

“I would put into place a policy where small-town, broad-enough farmer’s markets got a grant.

“I would want to create a set value for food stamps at farmers markets.

“Gosh, I could go on and on.”

But essentially, she says she would enact policies to make healthful food more affordable.

She says people today can spend just one dollar to buy bad food containing “a gazillion calories.” But that same dollar doesn’t buy many healthful-food calories.

She’s right. I told Michaels that Adam Carolla has joked many times that we can buy a ton of food at Taco Bell for less than $5.

“That’s right — the dollar menu,” Michaels says.

“But that dollar menu is going to cost (fast-food customers) hundreds of thousands of dollars down the road in doctors, health-care costs, medications.

“In fact, health-related issues are the No. 1 cause of bankruptcy in our country.”

Michaels sounds like a politician, am I right? But she laughs when I ask whether she will ever run for office.

“I don’t think I would get one campaign contribution,” she says.

Besides, Michaels is busy with NBC’s “The Biggest Loser,” while raising a 2-year-old and a baby with partner Heidi Rhoades in L.A.

“We went straight to two kids, and there’s never a moment of peace ever. Ever!” Michaels says and chuckles.

“But you deal with it and do your best. Kids fall down. Projects get screwed up. Meetings get missed. You give up the idea of being perfect fast, that’s for sure.”

Her Vegas gig on Saturday is all about helping people, she says.

“Of course, you’re going to learn how to lose weight, how to lose it fast, how to keep it off, and how to do it safely,” Michaels says.

“But at its core, the show is about the question: Why haven’t you done it before? How are you not living in your truth? Wanting a change? Feeling dissatisfied? Feeling stuck in your life? Are you waking up every morning asking yourself, ‘Is this all that there is?’

“And if you are, that is unacceptable. There are people out there that are happy, that are achieving their dreams, that are living in their truth, so why not you?”

Because Michaels is such a hard-ass on NBC, I asked her if she thinks Americans are generally lazy and unfocused.

“No, I never feel they’re lazy and unfocused,” she says.

“THEY believe they’re lazy and unfocused. I push them because I know they’re not. I push them so they can see how strong and capable they actually are.”

IT’S ME O’CLOCK

Come see me host Friday night’s two-year anniversary of Insert Coins — downtown’s “barcade” with 60 old arcade games, plus 40 game consoles (PS 3, Xbox 360, etc.). Code phrase: “All your base are belong to us.”

Doug Elfman’s column appears Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. He also writes for Neon on Fridays. Email him at delfman@reviewjournal.com. He blogs at reviewjournal.com/elfman.