Attorney may have say on O.J.


Bruce Fromong is best known as one of the victims in the odd, intriguing O.J. Simpson memorabilia heist. But earlier this week he turned up outside the Regional Justice Center as Simpson and his attorneys worked to score a new trial inside District Judge Linda Bell’s courtroom.

After dropping off witness Mike Gilbert, who testified in the hearing, Fromong told KSNV-TV, Channel 3, reporter Christine Kim what he thought about the process and the notorious ex-football player who was once his running mate.

“Mike threw me under the bus today,” Fromong said. “O.J.’s going to throw Mike under the bus tomorrow. ... I guess you try every angle you can when you’re in prison. You know, I’d want to get out, too.”

Does that sound like the testimony is just a tad staged to you?

“I forgave O.J. a long time ago,” Fromong continued. “Now it’s up to the judicial system. I have no hard feelings against O.J. We were friends for a long time before this. We’ll be friends for a long time after.”

Simpson’s attorneys Ozzie Fumo and Patricia Palm argue their client was grossly misrepresented during his 2008 robbery trial by defense lawyer Yale Galanter, whose reputation has taken a beating all week. Simpson’s former BFF is scheduled to take the witness stand today and defend his competence as the former football star’s legal advocate.

Before their parting of the ways, Simpson and Galanter spent a great deal of time together in and out of the courtroom.

In 2008, Galanter was a fierce if ineffective advocate.

Given that soured relationship, and that Galanter is essentially being accused of transgressions that if proved would be enough to yank his law license, I’m left wondering if the lawyer will be tempted to make public any admissions Simpson might have made during their time together that would paint the Juice as more calculating than he appeared during Wednesday’s testimony.

Under attorney Palm’s questioning, Simpson managed to portray himself as something of a victim of circumstance, not the leader of a gaggle of goofballs who managed to commit felonies while attempting to collect the Juice’s own memorabilia.

Simpson swears he has nothing to conceal.

But I wonder how much Galanter might reveal.

MOULIN ROUGE: The Moulin Rouge, touted as Southern Nevada’s first interracial casino, continues to fascinate students of Las Vegas history.

That history will be celebrated Thursday evening at the Neon Museum on the 58th anniversary of its opening on Bonanza Road.

Filmmaker Stan Armstrong will screen part of his documentary on the casino in a program that includes a panel discussion by historians Claytee White and Michael Green. The even is set to begin at 6 p.m. at the Neon Museum at 770 Las Vegas Boulevard North. (Information: www.neonmuseum.org.)

QUOTABLE GOMES: The voice of the late Nevada gaming agent and casino man Dennis Gomes shines throughout “Hit Me!” the story of his mob-fighting days in Las Vegas recently published by daughter Danielle Gomes and Jay Bonansinga. In the book, the hall-of-fame gaming regulator shellacs the Nevada Gaming Commission for its suspicious decision-making. To wit:

“Gomes noticed the faint smell of varnish as he entered the Nevada Gaming Commission hearing room. He was certain that no amount of varnish would be enough to cover all the tainted decisions that had been made there.”

I’m guessing the commission will leave that line out of its next news release.

The book explores several major casino corruption investigations Gomes spearheaded while with the state Gaming Control Board.

ON THE BOULEVARD: Everybody’s favorite nice-guy gangster actor Steve “Bobby Bacala” Schirripa is coming out with his latest hilarious self-help book, this one titled, “Big Daddy’s Rules: Raising Daughters is Tougher Than I Look.” The former Las Vegas resident and ex-Riviera entertainment director is the proud father of two daughters. It’s only a rumor that they actually listen to him when he does his godfather impression.

Have an item for the Bard of the Boulevard? Email comments and contributions to Smith@reviewjournal.com or call 702-383-0295. Follow him on Twitter @jlnevadasmith.