Las Vegas link to New York sexting scandal not surprising


The latest phone sexting scandal involving creepy former congressman-turned-New York City mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner has a Las Vegas connection.

Surprise, surprise, surprise.

Sydney Leathers, the young woman dumping out Weiner’s tawdry texts, on Thursday morning was represented in the media by Lou Colagiovanni, who spoke to CNN from a set with the Strip background.

Colagiovanni is an independent political writer, blogger and Internet chat room moderator whose We Survived Bush, You’ll Survive Obama Facebook site boasts more than 181,000 likes. He is listed as the editor-in-chief of ruthless-politics.com and in a brief conversation Thursday said he is a paid contributor to Examiner.com.

Colagiovanni said he moved to Las Vegas a month ago and has known Leathers more than two years. He said she initially contacted Weiner because she was a fan of his political views.

Obviously, the chat morphed into something more graphic. Weiner referred to himself in texts as “Carlos Danger.” With Leathers as a last name, I don’t think she felt it necessary to use a racy moniker.

“I believe that Anthony Weiner became enthralled with Sydney because she’s a beautiful young lady, and acted on his urges,” he said. “He has a problem not being able to resist his darker urges.”

Colagiovanni said he is not being paid as a political operative in connection with the mayor’s race, nor has he sought compensation for his version of events associated with the tawdry texts.

He did, however, appear grateful for the sudden increase in interest in his Facebook site.

That gratitude didn’t translate to Weiner, whom Colagiovanni called a “sociopath, predator and pathological liar.”

Whether that disqualifies the political weasel from competing in the New York mayor’s race remains to be seen.

METRO’S FINEST: It’s hard to describe the amount of time and training Metro’s Search and Rescue team members put in to qualify for a place on that elite squad. Put simply, they train constantly.

They are so good at what they do that it’s possible to forget just how dangerous the job can be.

Unfortunately, the community has now been reminded of that fact.

Kyle Canyon residents gathered Wednesday evening at Mount Charleston Baptist Church for a “flashlight vigil” to pay tribute to the life of Metro officer David Vanbuskirk, who was killed during a rescue effort Monday night near Mary Jane Falls.

A member of Metro’s elite Search and Rescue team, Vanbuskirk was 36.

Pastor Earl Greene, who rose to chief of the Clark County Fire Department during a nearly 33-year career, led the gathering.

“My experience has been that those guys and those ladies that get involved in this, love this,” Greene said afterward. “It’s a calling. It goes beyond the money. They really love what they do, versus just having a job to make money. These people are some of the best athletes. They have some of the best minds. They try to excel in whatever they do.”

MOUNTAIN CHALLENGES: At a Saturday morning meeting in Kyle Canyon’s Old Town subdivision, officials from a variety of county, state and federal agencies discussed the potential challenges coming for Mount Charleston residents following the recent Carpenter 1 Fire. Topping their list: the dramatically increased possibility of flash floods during our summer monsoon season.

One mountain resident was overheard saying, “What next, locusts and snakes?”

YOUR TOWN: There’s still plenty of time to sign up for the Race for Our Kids, the 5K and 1-mile event set for Sept. 13 at Exploration Park in the Mountain’s Edge community. Proceeds benefit Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Foundation of Nevada. (Information:candlelightersnv.org.)

ON THE BOULEVARD: Community boosters who would prefer that stories about the Las Vegas mob go away will be positively apoplectic after learning of the Mob-Con 2013 gathering planned for Sept. 7-8 at Palace Station. It appears to be a Frank Cullotta production, and the former Chicago hitman should know a little about organized crime.

Have an item for Bard of the Boulevard? Email comments and contributions to jsmith@reviewjournal.com or call (702) 383-0295.