UNLV rally as persuasive as a temper tantrum



Since when did crowds of people milling about, shouting profanities and waving crudely painted signs get elevated to the level of persuasive argumentation?

To me the scene at UNLV Thursday night had all the eloquence and persuasive power of an organized temper tantrum. They should’ve been sent to their rooms without supper.

But no, the children seemed to be proud of themselves.

"This is great!" UNLV student body Vice President Vik Sehdev was quoted as saying. "Last time this happened was, like, in the '60s."

Yes, and before that we had those highly regarded expressions of community umbrage known as lynch mobs.

The rally was a reaction to the governor’s proposed higher education budget cuts. Instead of serious debate and reasoned rhetoric from the halls of higher education, we got outrage.

As reporter Richard Lake wrote:

“Students are outraged.

“Administrators are outraged.

“Professors, staff and activists are outraged.”

And university system Chancellor Jim Rogers and UNLV President David Ashley were their cheerleaders, whipping up anger and avarice for other people’s money instead of enlightened discourse.

There were chants of “Rogers, Rogers, Rogers.” Did he score a touchdown?

There were chants of “No more cuts, no more cuts …” ad nauseam.

One student said she was there as a “show of force.” Just what we need, campus where a show of force trumps everything.

How about some speeches that are more than petulant whining? How about written essays that offer solutions instead of form letters to which the students can affix their “Xs”? How about rational letters to the legislators and/or the newspapers? How about letters to campus newspaper? Or even comments posted on the online Rebel Yell story about the rally? First time I looked, there were none. At noon there were two and both were related to this blog posting.

They were proud of themselves. For what?

Several signs said, “We are your future.”

Now there’s something to raise the hairs on the back of your neck.

Students at UNLV protest proposed budget cuts
Students at UNLV protest proposed budget cuts