Ad attacks Titus on taxes


A new negative ad from Americans for Tax Reform criticizes Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., for misrepresenting an anti-tax pledge signed by her Republican opponent, Joe Heck, and says voters shouldn't send her back to Washington for a second term.

The ad says "Dina Titus attacks people for promising not to raise taxes."

It goes on to criticize her for statements about the Americans for Tax Reform anti-tax pledge. The pledge, which Heck signed, is a promise from candidates not to increase taxes once in office. Titus equated the pledge to a promise from Heck to oppose the repeal of specific tax breaks Democrats say help companies send American jobs overseas.

Non-partisan observers, including FactCheck.org, have said the claim from Titus is false because the pledge doesn't cover specific tax breaks, like the one mentioned in the Titus ad attacking Heck. FactCheck.org also questioned the premise that the tax breaks in question result in a significant number of jobs moving overseas.

"It is just more negative ads to hide her liberal record," the Americans for Tax Reform ad narrator says. It goes on to allege Titus voted for higher taxes and criticizes her for voting in favor of the $787 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, or stimulus.

The ad is just one in a coming barrage of third-party advertising expected to pour into Southern Nevada to influence voters in the 3rd Congressional District. Titus is seeking a second term and is challenged by Joe Heck, a physician and former state senator. Campaign committees for the Democratic and Republican parties have reserved millions of dollars in air time, and independent groups like Emily's List and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal workers have weighed in, pushing negative ads against Heck. Americans for Tax Reform is an example of what sort of attacks groups from the right will employ against the incumbent. Titus led Heck by 4 percentage points in the latest survey by Mason-Dixon Polling & Research, which was within the margin of error of 5 percentage points.