'Hit Parade' includes great history of music, dance


Saturday night was special when I was growing up in Kansas City. Mom would make hot cocoa for me, my older brother and baby sister, and we would stay up late and watch "Your Hit Parade" (1950-59) on our Admiral console television. Remember Dorothy Collins, Russell Arms, Snooky Lanson and Gisele MacKenzie singing the top-rated songs of the week?

On June 4-5, I'll relive that time when producer Ed Mathews presents "Hit Parade The Show" at the Suncoast. The fully scripted musical incorporates two decades of great music illustrated by music and dance. "The show is a living tribute to the past and brings back the fondest of memories for the audiences," Mathews said.

Performers include the Lionardo Orchestra, Carmine Mandia, Mark Giovi, Genevieve Dew, Bobby Brooks Hamilton, Ron Smith, The Swing City Dolls and Charley Raymond. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $15.95. For more information: 636-7075 or suncoastcasino.com.

seniors on Stage

Considering the entertainment scene this month, one might think that entertainment directors are trying to get our attention -- those of us on the other side of 60 and 70. I'll start with 77-year-old Joan Rivers, who is scheduled to perform June 2-4 at The Venetian with future performances scheduled Oct. 20-22 and Nov. 17-19. Known for her sharp tongue and rampant humor, the comedienne is also a red carpet diva, best-selling author, Emmy Award-winning television talk show host and jewelry designer. Showtime is 9 p.m. Tickets begin at $55.75. For more information: 414-9000 or www.venetian.com.

Next up is 77-year-old Larry King, the award-winning broadcast icon who will debut his new stage show at The Mirage on June 11.  King will give fans a funny look at himself starting with his life growing up as a street-smart kid in Brooklyn. The show marks King's first stage appearance since completing his triumphant 25-year run on CNN's "Larry King Live." Showtime is 10 p.m. Tickets start at $69.99. For more information: 791-7111 or www.mirage.com.

Already on stage is 72-year-old Rich Little. He is performing at the Riviera through June 12 in his acclaimed show, "Will the Real Rich Little Please Stand up?" The legendary comedian and master mimic can be seen at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday in the Starlite Theater. Tickets begin at $29.99. Senior and military with valid ID receive a $20 discount for preferred and VIP seating. For more information: 734-5110 or www.rivierahotel.com.

paying Homage to Old Vegas

Chris Phillips heads up the group Zowie Bowie and appreciates the maverick spirit that founded the city. "Once I moved here, I wanted to pay tribute to that old vibe that made Las Vegas what it is today," he said. "This show is all about cufflinks and cocktails." Zowie Bowie's "Vintage Vegas Show," featuring Marley Taylor and a 14-piece orchestra conducted by David Perrico, performs every at 7 p.m. Sunday at Ovation inside Green Valley Ranch. There is a $10 cover charge at the door. For more information: 617-7777 or www.greenvalleyranch resort.com.

Love Story

Charlie Chaplin wrote, directed and starred in the 1931 movie "City Lights," the romantic comedy in which Chaplin portrays his famous character as he tries to win the affections of a blind girl who thinks her suitor is both handsome and wealthy. This year marks the 80th anniversary of the legendary silent film, which is scheduled to be shown at 8 p.m. June 3 at the Henderson Pavilion (200 S. Green Valley Parkway). In recognition of this, the Henderson Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Taras Krysa, will perform an updated orchestration of the film's musical score. It will be shown in its entirety on a screen above the orchestra.

"We're transforming the Pavilion into a giant movie theater," said Andrea Primo, director of Henderson's Cultural Arts & Tourism department. "The movie and the orchestra will create a unique entertainment experience, a first-time offering at the venue." All tickets are $10. For more information: 267-4849 or www.hendersonlive.com.

and finally

One Sunday, while counting the money in the weekly offering, the pastor of a small church found a pink envelope containing $1,000. It happened again the next week.  The following Sunday he watched an elderly woman put the distinctive pink envelope on the plate. This went on for weeks until the pastor, overcome by curiosity, approached her. 

 "Ma'am," he said. "I couldn't help but notice that you put $1,000 a week in the collection plate."

"Why, yes," she replied. "Every week my son sends me money and I give some of it to the church." 

"That's wonderful," he replied. "Are you sure you can afford this? How much does he send you?"  

The elderly woman answered, "$10,000 a week."  

The pastor was amazed. "Your son is very successful. What does he do for a living?" 

 "He's a veterinarian," she answered. 

"That's an honorable profession," he said, "but I had no idea they made that much money. Where does he practice?"  

The woman answered proudly: "In Nevada. He has two cat houses: one in Las Vegas and one in Reno."

Jack Bulavsky is a 35-year Nevadan and has covered the entertainment, dining and gaming industries for local and national publications. Contact him at jackbulavsky@yahoo.com.

 

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