Fearmonger does little to improve conversation on terrorism


For Steve Emerson, the danger is very clear and very present: A surprising number of American officials and institutions are in the tank to Islamic extremists and their handmaidens.

Emerson accuses the Obama administration of being infiltrated by radical followers of Islam inside our own country and throughout the world.

That's right. Infiltrated.

Emerson, the executive director of the Investigative Project on Terrorism, spent an hour last week with the Review-Journal editorial board and was accompanied by Elliot Karp, president and CEO of the Jewish Federation of Las Vegas. In the short time Emerson spent at the newspaper, he managed to indict a number of law enforcement institutions and officers as patsies for the Muslim Brotherhood and the Islamic extremists in our midst.

For one, there's the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Emerson said the FBI is so focused not offending Islamist and Arabic groups with allegiances to Hamas and Hezbollah that it's getting in the way of anti-terrorism investigations.

"The agents on the ground understand exactly what's going on," Emerson says cryptically of the bureau's political atmosphere. When asked to elaborate, he replies, "I have to protect my sources."

Forgive me, but I thought the FBI was doing a pretty good job on the terrorism front. Turns out they're falling down on the job.

It's OK, though. Emerson has confidence in his own ability to spot the terrorists among us. He brags that his sources are "sometimes even better than the bureau."

He adds that his field intelligence was superior to the FBI's in part because "informants are more likely to work for us."

That's not all. He also has the sneaking suspicion that a talk he was scheduled to give to a group of CIA operatives was derailed by the Obama administration. Who knew President Barack Obama had enough hours in the day to dispatch CIA Director David Petraeus to teach Emerson a lesson?

Then there's Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca. In 2010, Baca was honored by the Council on Arab-Islamic Relations (CAIR), which has been linked to Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood. CAIR also actively challenges Muslim stereotypes and presents the Islamic side of issues.

"He believes CAIR is a wonderful organization," Emerson says sarcastically. " … I'm not calling him evil, or fundamentally stupid, but he is in bed with the bad guys."

Obviously, Emerson isn't shy about pointing fingers. Nor is he simply a sign-waving conspiracy theorist. His allies on the right consider him a Cassandra who warns us about the dangers of Islamic extremism at home and abroad, and especially as it affects Israel. He pens op-ed pieces in major newspapers, is often quoted on television and radio talk shows, is cheered on the speaking circuit, and has a loyal following on his website. He is a leading firebrand from the school of thought that goes something like, "Not all Muslims are plotting terrorist acts, just most of them."

He claims he is the victim of "a fatwa by NPR" largely because National Public Radio officials don't invite him on their programs these days. But you can still catch plenty of Emerson's opinions in a variety of media and networks.

Lest you think he's just a right-wing extremist out to frighten people, Emerson repeats often that his work is dangerous and he has received many threats. He says things like "I've got to look over my shoulder every day," and "If I had a wife and kids, I couldn't do this."

Certainly not. He made it sound a little dangerous just sitting in the room with him.

That's Emerson's problem whether you believe he's full of facts or fudge. His hyperbolic rhetoric plays well on the fundraising circuit, but it does nothing to forward the understanding of complex issues.

The Middle East is a political tinderbox. There's heated talk of possible U.S. and Israeli military intervention in Iran to halt its development of nuclear technology.

At the risk of becoming part of a vast conspiracy to silence Steve Emerson, that complex conversation isn't improved by his shouts of conspiracy at the highest levels of our government.

John L. Smith's column appears Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday. Email him at Smith@reviewjournal.com or call 702-383-0295. He also blogs at lvrj.com/blogs/smith.

 

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