Area Briefing, June 5-11


TRAFFIC SAFETY MEASURES PLANNED NEAR MIDDLE SCHOOL

Clark County and state leaders were recently joined by faculty members and students from Faiss Middle School, 9525 W. Maule Ave., to highlight upcoming traffic safety improvements.

New traffic signals are set to be installed at the intersections of Fort Apache Road and Maule Avenue and at Fort Apache and Warm Springs Road.

The new traffic signal at Fort Apache and Maule is expected to be turned on in mid-July, while the one at Fort Apache and Warm Springs is set to be activated by mid-August.

The new signals are meant to enhance safety for drivers and pedestrians in the area, which includes the school and Wet ’n’ Wild Las Vegas, 7055 S. Fort Apache Road.

For more information, visit rtcsnv.com/fri.

EXECUTIVE HONORED FOR DROWNING PREVENTION EFFORTS

The National Drowning Prevention Alliance recently recognized Joseph M. Vassallo, president of Paragon Pools, with the 2014 Lifesaver Award for his years of promoting water safety.

Vassallo was honored for his signature Float Like A Duck program, an annual public awareness campaign that educates the public on the importance of safety around water.

The award honors exceptional work regarding drowning prevention at the community level.

For more information, visit ndpa.org.

SITE OFFERS WAYS TO STEER CLEAR OF TROUBLE DURING SUMMER PARTIES

The Rape Crisis Center encourages residents to visit partysmartinlv.com for tips on staying safe during summertime parties.

The site reminds residents that sex without consent is sexual assault. Visitors can learn ways to avoid unwanted sexual situations and watch videos from Strip performers Carrot Top and Criss Angel. Statistics about sexual assault also are included on the site. Tips include:

— Get your own drinks, and never leave them unattended.

— If you start to feel sick or overly intoxicated when you have had little or no alcohol, get to a safe place immediately and call someone for help.

— Always be aware of your surroundings and location, and be aware of security personnel, using them as a resource if necessary.

— If you see something, say something. Be a responsible bystander.

— Make sure your cellphone is charged.

— Watch for red-flag behavior, such as if someone keeps encouraging you to drink or doesn’t take no for an answer when asking you to talk or dance with him.

Site visitors also can download the Rape Crisis Center app Circle of 6, which can alert friends when someone is in an uncomfortable situation.

The center launched the website last year in cooperation with the Metropolitan Police Department and funding support from TAO Cares.

POLICE OFFICER WINS LATINA OF THE YEAR AWARD

The National Latino Peace Officers Association recently named Sgt. Cindy Rodriguez of the Metropolitan Police Department as a recipient of the national Latina of the Year Award.

Rodriguez was honored May 24 during the 41st annual National Latino Peace Officers Association awards and installation banquet at the Tropicana, 3801 Las Vegas Blvd. South.

Rodriguez was selected for taking her personal time to mentor and train other men and women. In the past year, she conducted several leadership classes that have prepared numerous officers for promotion.

Recommendations for Latina of the Year are received from throughout the United States. The criteria include commitment to excellence, exceptional leadership skills and exemplary behavior on the job or in the community.

GRADUATES TO SERVE AS MENTORS FOR HOPE FOR PRISONERS PROGRAM

Ninety-three people graduated May 24 from a HOPE for Prisoners training program to become certified reentry mentors.

The graduates included police officers, community leaders, pastors, students and teachers who have made a commitment to enter into a mentoring relationship with participants enrolled in the HOPE for Prisoners Reentry Program.

The program assists adults and youths with re-entering society after exiting the judicial system.

Clark County Judge Cheryl Moss led the new mentors in an oath of commitment to strengthen, encourage and build up those being released into the community.

BRIDGE OPENS FOR PEDESTRIANS AND BICYCLISTS

The new Far Hills Bridge for pedestrians and bicyclists opened May 28 at Far Hills Avenue and the 215 Beltway, allowing for safe and convenient access and use of area trails.

Officials from the city of Las Vegas and The Howard Hughes Corp. led a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the bridge’s opening.

The bridge is part of a loop trail and part of plans to create an interlocking trail system across the valley.

FIRE RESTRICTIONS ADDED AT STATE PARKS

Additional fire restrictions were implemented May 15 at Big Bend, the Valley of Fire and Spring Mountain Ranch State Park because of the high potential for wildfires, according to the Nevada Division of State Parks and the Nevada Division of Forestry.

The following acts are prohibited in the designated areas:

— Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or in an area that is barren or cleared of flammable vegetation.

— Operating vehicles or motorized equipment off of paved, gravel or dirt roads.

— Operating vehicles or other motorized equipment in wildland areas without an ax, shovel and at least 1 gallon of water.

— Igniting fireworks.

— Operating a welding torch or any other device that may cause a fire.

— Building or using a fire or stove outside an established fireplace in a picnic area or campground or places of habitation. Portable stoves using jelled petroleum or pressured liquid fuel are an exception. Charcoal grills are allowed in designated areas but will be restricted on windy or critical fire days. Restrictions will be implemented as indicated by the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Agency and the National Weather Service. Daily information is available at wrh.noaa.gov.

Violations are considered misdemeanors and are punishable by fines of up to $1,000, imprisonment for up to six months or both.

RTC UNVEILS NEW SOUTHERN NEVADA BICYCLE MAP

The Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada recently unveiled a new Southern Nevada bicycle route map in celebration of National Bike Month in May.

The map includes new and updated bicycle routes, lanes and shared-used paths for beginners and experienced bicyclists.

The map is available at rtcsnv.com/cycling and is set to be distributed to area bicycle shops and at community events throughout the valley. Some of the more popular, family-friendly bicycle rides include:

— Henderson: Beginning at the corner of Chapata Drive and Casady Hollow Avenue, head north on Chapata Drive, then take the shared-use path east. The path crosses Gibson Road and continues to Acacia Park, 50 Casa Del Fuego St. The ride is less than 2 miles, with parks at each end.

— North Las Vegas: Beginning at West Ann Road and Ferrell Street, travel south one block along Ferrell Street. Merge onto the shared-use path alongside the flood channel and continue east. The path crosses Simmons and Clayton streets and connects to Sandstone Ridge Park over a pedestrian/bicycle bridge on the left. Sandstone Ridge Park, 1661 W. Hammer Lane, has a bicycle path circling the park.

— Summerlin: Beginning at 9550 Trails Center Drive, travel west on the shared-use path that runs under Spring Gate Lane. Continue west, crossing under Crestdale Lane. The path ends at Snow Trail Drive. The ride is 1.8 miles round trip, with park facilities at each end of the trail.

For more information, visit rtcsnv.com.

SUMMIT TO FOCUS ON EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

A Crisis Management in the Hospitality Industry summit is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. June 12 at the UNLV Stan Fulton Building, 801 E. Flamingo Road.

The event will focus on emergency planning and creating a culture of preparedness. Anyone employed in the hospitality industry is encouraged to attend, including executives, owners of hospitality companies, security and human resources personnel, public relations and crisis management professionals, health care managers and others.

U.S. Army Col. Russell Kern is set to provide the keynote address. Other speakers are slated to include communications professionals and first responders.

For more information or to register, visit unlv.edu/hotel/chrc.

CROSSING GUARDS SOUGHT BY NORTH LAS VEGAS POLICE DEPARTMENT

The North Las Vegas Police Department is seeking crossing guards to work near elementary schools for the upcoming academic year.

Crossing guards are responsible for assisting young students across busy intersections on their way to and from school.

The part-time position pays $9 hourly, and shifts are usually from 6:30 to 9:15 a.m. and from 1:30 to 4 p.m. when school is in session.

Applicants must possess a high school diploma or GED; pass a police background check and a drug test; and possess a valid Nevada driver’s license. Being bilingual is a plus but not required.

Residents can apply by visiting cityofnorthlasvegas.com and clicking on “employment.”

For more information, call the crossing guard supervisor at 702-633-1017, ext. 6671.

APPLICANTS SOUGHT FOR HENDERSON LEAD PAINT REMOVAL

The remediation of lead paint from a downtown Henderson home was recently completed, marking the first major project under the city’s Neighborhood Services Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes Program.

The home is owned by expectant parents Eddie and Barbara Whitney, who opted for the program to make their home safer for their unborn child. Work on the home’s exterior lasted about 45 days at a cost of about $15,000. Inside the home, the doors and door frames were replaced, along with mold removal at a cost of about $6,500.

The program is free to Henderson residents who own or rent their homes. To be eligible, homes must have been built before 1978, house a child 5 or younger, house an expectant mother or be frequently visited by a child 5 or younger. The family income must be less than 80 percent of the area median income, which is $49,200 for a family of four.

The city was awarded $2.3 million in grants through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control to reduce lead-based paint hazards in homes with children or pregnant women.

The adverse health effects of lead exposure in children include intellectual and behavioral deficits, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The city aims to address lead hazards in 80 homes over the next three years and is seeking applicants.

For more information, visit cityofhenderson.com/lead or call the city of Henderson Neighborhood Services Division at 702-267-2000.

SCHOOL PROGRAM DONATES $2,000 TO SUICIDE PREVENTION NONPROFIT

The local nonprofit International Suicide Prevention recently announced receiving a $2,000 grant from the We R Community public education program at Las Vegas High School, 6500 E. Sahara Ave.

International Suicide Prevention has developed new procedures that shorten emergency hotline calls to 10 minutes without repeats and two innovative self-help procedures translated into several languages, according to the organization.

We R Community helps high school students learn about the world of philanthropy by teaching them how to choose area nonprofits to support financially and through volunteerism.

International Suicide Prevention said it has no paid employees or permanent office.

For more information, visit supportisp.org.

TAKE STEPS TO STAY COOL DURING WARM WEATHER

The Valley Health System recently offered heat-related safety tips for residents as the weather begins growing warmer.

— Run errands in the early morning or late evening to avoid the hottest parts of the day.

— Wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing, a hat and sunscreen while outside. Use umbrellas to fend off the sun’s harsh rays.

— Cool your car as much as possible. Crack the windows for ventilation and cover your steering wheel and car seats.

— Keep close watch on younger children and create a communication plan with older relatives and friends so they know how to reach you in case of an emergency.

— Schedule hydration breaks throughout the day. When playing outdoors, take water breaks every 20 to 30 minutes. Always bring extra water when running errands.

— Water is the best source to rehydrate your body, while sports beverages can help replace the salt and minerals lost during exercise.

— Know the signs and symptoms of heat illness, including those for heat exhaustion: muscle cramping; heavy sweating; weakness; cold, pale and clammy skin; a fast but weak pulse; and nausea or vomiting. Heat stroke symptoms include body temperatures of more than 103 degrees; hot, red, dry or moist skin; a rapid and strong pulse; and unconsciousness.

For more information, visit valleyhealthsystemlv.com.

VALLEY EVENT TO PROMOTE WILDFIRE AWARENESS

Mount Charleston’s annual Pine Needle Pickup & Barbecue is scheduled for June 7.

A 7 a.m. cleanup is planned, followed by a free barbecue from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Mount Charleston Fire Station 81, 25 Ski Chalet Place off state Route 157 in Kyle Canyon.

The Clark County Fire Department is partnering with local, federal and state agencies to put on the event, aimed at promoting wildfire awareness and reminding residents about the potential for wildfires during spring and summer, when vegetation is driest.

For more information on the Mount Charleston event, call Liz Claggett at 702-387-3111.

SAFE SUMMER NIGHTS TO FEATURE MUSIC, ENTERTAINMENT AND INFORMATION

Residents are invited to enjoy free entertainment, refreshments, health services and a resource fair while getting to know each other during upcoming Safe Summer Nights events put on by the city of Las Vegas.

Music, children’s games and face painting are planned, and free hot dogs and water will be available while supplies last. Attendees also can learn about community resources, including summer activities for youths, health services, community safety, money management programs and adult education opportunities.

The events are set for 5:30-7:30 p.m. June 25 at the Stupak Community Center, 251 W. Boston Ave., and 6-8 p.m. July 18 at the East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave.

For more information, contact Lisa Campbell at 702-229-5406 or lcampbell@lasvegasnevada.gov.

INFANT AND CHILD CPR CLASSES AVAILABLE AT UMC

University Medical Center plans an infant and child cardiopulmonary resuscitation class at 9 a.m. June 7 and 2 p.m. July 8 at the Family Resource Center, 1120 Shadow Lane.

The class requires a refundable $10 deposit.

For more information or to register, call 702-383-2229.

 

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