Henderson city manager to retire in May


Henderson City Manager Mark Calhoun will step down in May, three years after he was appointed to the top administrative position and nearly three decades after he went to work for the city.

Calhoun said the decision was a long time coming.

"It has been no secret that I have been considering retirement for some time, and in fact I have been having discussions internally since December regarding the timing of my departure," Calhoun wrote in an email sent to Henderson city employees on Monday.

Calhoun in his email said he would work with Mayor Andy Hafen and the City Council as he prepares to leave the position.

He replaced Mary Kay Peck, the city's first and only female city manager. Peck challenged her termination, and the case went to arbitration. She prevailed, winning a settlement worth nearly $1.3 million on Feb. 15, 2011.

According to the website Transparent Nevada, Calhoun received a base pay of $225,000 in 2010, the latest year figures are available.

The city has several options in seeking Calhoun's replacement because the city manager is an appointed position, according to communications director Bud Cranor. The City Council could conduct a national or local search or hire from within, as was the case with both Calhoun and Peck.

One potential candidate is Jacob Snow, general manager of the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada. Cranor said Mayor Andy Hafen has had conversations with Snow regarding the job.

"There is no offer in place to Jacob Snow or anyone else that I'm aware of," Cranor said.

Tracy Bower, a spokeswoman with the Regional Transportation Commission, confirmed Snow has been in discussions with Hafen about the job. "He has had conversations with Mayor Hafen, but he has not received an offer. He is committed to the RTC."

Calhoun was an assistant city manager from 2001 to 2009. In that position he managed the fire, police, public works and utility services departments, according to his biography on the city website. He also managed the city's economic development and neighborhood services departments.

In 1983 he was hired as the city's engineer. From there he served as the public works director for 12 years during a time of intense growth.

Calhoun declined comment Tuesday.

Contact reporter Doug McMurdo at dmcmurdo@reviewjournal.com or 702-224-5512.

 

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