U.S. being misled on Syrian civil war


To the editor:

We have been inundated with pictures of young Syrian children killed by chemical weapons. Can we believe what those photographs purport to show? Many photos coming out of Syria are staged propaganda. Both sides do it. So how can we explain those pictures?

Those who produced the photos must have perceived an opportunity, a motive and a goal. The opportunity came when naive President Barack Obama drew a red line. That gave the rebels a strong motive to exploit this and draw our military might into the conflict on their side. They will achieve their goal if they sucker us into this civil war.

If there are atrocities being committed in the Middle East, it must be up to the other Muslim nations to intervene. We must ask: How will intervening in Syria serve our national interest? As I see it, this civil war poses no real or immediate threat to our national security.

BURTON SIMPSON

LAS VEGAS

To serve and protect

To the editor:

I believe we should treat our police officers better. They are here to protect us. Yet we point guns at them, shoot them and are angry that they shoot back (“Police shoot woman in face after 24-hour standoff,” Aug. 29 Review-Journal). I think anyone foolish enough to point a gun at a police officer should be shot.

This police officer should not get in trouble for shooting a woman who holds her own children hostage. This woman should get into trouble because she was threatening to kill a child, then shot through the door at a police officer. She could have killed someone, even her own child. We should thank police officers for saving the two children, instead of naming and blaming the police for taking out the bad person.

ELIJAH BETHARD

LAS VEGAS

Physical education

To the editor:

I think that physical education should be required throughout high school, rather than just through sophomore year. Obesity is on the rise but would surely drop with such a requirement. Plus, instead of doing only math, English, science and the like, there would be a fun subject that would get kids moving and help clear their minds.

ANDREW WARNICK

LAS VEGAS

Fonda a traitor

To the editor:

Regarding Joe Marroso’s letter (“Vietnam to blame,” Wednesday Review-Journal), Mr. Marroso needed to add a few more facts concerning “Hanoi” Jane Fonda. When American prisoners of war finally began returning home (some of them having been held captive for up to nine years) and described the torture they had endured at the hands of the North Vietnamese, Ms. Fonda said the United States should not hail the POWs as heroes, because they were hypocrites and liars. Ms. Fonda also said the POWs she met in Vietnam hadn’t been tortured. They hadn’t been starved, they hadn’t been brainwashed.

It is also undeniable that some American soldiers came to harm as a direct result of Ms. Fonda’s actions, an outcome she should have reasonably anticipated. Ms. Fonda’s efforts could fall under the definition of giving aid and comfort to the enemy.

LINDA CASSARO

LAS VEGAS

Crowded schools

To the editor:

I have an idea on how to eliminate overcrowding at our public schools. It’s an easy fix, which is why our politicians can’t figure it out. For students in this country illegally, either remove all of them, or charge each student’s parents the amount the school spends per student, per year to have the privilege of attending our public schools.

The taxpayers are sick and tired of illegal immigrants running up our bills for school and health care costs, to name just a couple. Let’s stop this foolishness once and for all. Let the illegal immigrants pay if they want to play.

BRYCE LEE

LAS VEGAS

 

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