Updated 

Take a look at each state’s most popular Fourth of July song


Struggling to make a Fourth of July playlist for your barbecue? Never fear: Spotify has put together a map showing each state’s most distinctive Fourth of July song.

The music-streaming company looked at which traditionally “American” songs get queued up more often on the Fourth of July in each state than on any other day.

Unsurprisingly, Lee Greenwood’s “God Bless the USA” was the top song in 22 states, including Nevada.

Miley Cyrus’ “Party in the USA” made a showing in Maine, New Hampshire and North Dakota. Meanwhile, all the Neil Young fans in the nation seem to be concentrated in South Dakota, which favored “Rockin’ the Free World.”

Only two states went with “The Star-Spangled Banner”: Michigan, where Lee Greenwood’s version of the national anthem reigns supreme, and Colorado, which favors the version by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

What’s confusing about the map is the presence of two songs commonly misunderstood to be patriotic: Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the U.S.A.” and Lenny Kravitz’s “American Women.”

“Born in the U.S.A.” was written in protest of the Vietnam War, and “American Women was written to poke fun at the U.S.

Find the large version of the map here.

Spotify also ranked all 50 states and the District of Columbia based on how much people in each state listened to Fourth of July-themed music on the holiday in 2013.

Nevada ranked 46 out of 51, so there’s room to move up.

First in the nation was Washington, D.C., fittingly. The top five were scattered across the nation:

  1. Washington, D.C.
  2. Nebraska
  3. Delaware
  4. Louisiana
  5. Utah

As were the bottom five:

  1. Hawaii (right below Nevada in the rankings)
  2. South Dakota (apparently Neil Young wasn’t enough to boost the state’s ranking)
  3. Maine
  4. New Hampshire
  5. Alaska (the only state that chose a Macklemore song — “American”)

You can check out Spotify’s Fourth of July playlist here.

Contact Stephanie Grimes at sgrimes@reviewjournal.com. Find her on Twitter: @stephgrimes

 

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