64°F
weather icon Clear

Las Vegas Market: Neutrals reign supreme (but not brown)

Blush. Rose quartz. Millennial pink.

Whatever you choose to call it, the pale cheery shade was abundant at the Las Vegas Market.

Along with other on-trend hues, it appeared on sofas, lamps, tables and a whole host of accessories.

Las Vegas interior designers observed a number of color and design trends at the annual convention at World Market Center.

Some trends they intend to adapt to their stylings this year. Others, they prefer to admire from the showroom floor.

Colors

As with most years, neutrals reigned supreme.

“Gray, charcoal and black are really popular this year,” says Shelley Gorman, interior designer and owner and curator of River North and SKG Designs. “But not a lot of brown. Brown is dead.”

Bold shades of green and blue showed up in upholstery and art prints.

“I saw a lot of this really rich blue and indigo, especially paired with matte gold,” Gorman says.

Also making a comeback is black, though mostly as an accent color.

Black could be seen on furniture legs and bases, in both glossy and satin finishes.

“It strikes me as timeless,” says Sue Conboy, owner and designer for Statement of Style. “I create contemporary and timeless designs. Black accents complement my style.”

When designing a living space, designers are hesitant to recommend bold hues.

“If you’re going to use the light pink, you have to really love it,” says Daniella Villamil of Daniella Villamil Interior Designs. “It’s a trend. And I usually stay away from trends.”

She insists that furniture is usually a long-term investment. “I don’t recommend it unless you’ll be happy with it for five to 10 years.”

If attempting color for your own home, Gorman advises sticking to one accent piece like a chair or art print. Villamil recommends starting with blue, which is likely to have more staying power.

Indoor-outdoor

Outdoor pieces that would look just as right indoors were hot items at this week’s show.

Conboy noticed a variety of indoor-outdoor area rugs, while Gorman was drawn to furniture.

Jeanne Hughes, national sales manager for Somers Furniture, says it’s an underrated home decor category.

“A lot of people are afraid to design the exterior,” Hughes says. “Because of the weather here, they’re afraid of materials that aren’t durable.”

But, she says, a yard or patio is a whole other room of the house. Designing it thoughtfully can help blend the two spaces.

“There is furniture that’s heavy enough to not blow away and made to last in this environment. Designers shouldn’t be afraid to use it,” she says.

Furniture styles

Bulky, midcentury modern pieces may be on their way out.

Hard, squared-off backs and armrests were replaced by rounded, half-moon shapes.

“So often you see the same things,” Villamil says. “It’s refreshing to see something new.”

Round, Parisian-style sofas and love seats took on textured upholstery with velvet and folds or bold colors.

While yearly trends can add timely touches, Villamil advises sticking with pieces that owners will still appreciate next season. “Even if the style is timeless, it has to be timeless for you.”

Contact Janna Karel at jkarel@reviewjournal.com. Follow @jannainprogress on Twitter.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST