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First look: 32-story condo building in downtown to be 379 feet tall

Updated November 14, 2023 - 8:23 am

The first renderings have been unveiled of Cello Tower, Las Vegas’ first residential high-rise condo building in more than a decade which will stand 379 feet when completed.

The 32-story tower, located within mixed-use development project Origin at Symphony Park in downtown Las Vegas will have retail, dining and public spaces on its ground floor and surrounding area. Sales for the condos — which are being developed by Red Ridge Development — are expected to start this winter and construction for the units are expected to be completed in fall of 2026.

The tower will comprise of 240 residences, including eight penthouses and have more than 40,000 square feet of amenities such as an elevated pool, pet spa, entertainment kitchen and cold plunge.

Pricing for one- and two-bedroom units starts at $700,000 and penthouses will start at $4.5 million.

Bob Hamrick, chairman and CEO of Coldwell Banker Premier Realty, who will be handling the sales, said they are expecting a wide variety of buyers including “athletes, executives, medical professionals, or second and third home buyers from across the country.”

This is the second high-rise announced for Symphony Park, following Symphony Park III, a 22-story high-rise with 270 residences that is under construction and expected to be completed by spring 2025. Las Vegas City Council approved the sale of the land in February to Red Ridge Development for nearly $12 million.

Cello Tower is part of the larger Symphony Park master-planned community that’s currently being built on 61 acres that was previously a Union Pacific rail yard. Symphony Park has revitalization roots all the way back to 2000 when city staff kicked off negotiations with Shopco Advisory Group for the parcel.

In an interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal in May, Mayor Carolyn Goodman noted the downtown core was previously a “deteriorated and crime-ridden area” that has started to undergo a gentrification shift led by Symphony Park.

Contact Patrick Blennerhassett at pblennerhassett@reviewjournal.com.

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