52°F
weather icon Clear

Two-thirds of US would struggle to cover $1,000 emergency — POLL

NEW YORK — Two-thirds of Americans would have difficulty coming up with the money to cover a $1,000 emergency, according to an exclusive poll released Thursday, a signal that despite years of recovery from the Great Recession, Americans’ financial conditions remain precarious as ever.

These financial difficulties span all income levels, according to the poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Seventy-five percent of people in households making less than $50,000 a year would have difficulty coming up with $1,000 to cover an unexpected bill. But when income rose to between $50,000 and $100,000, the difficulty decreased only modestly to 67 percent.

Even for the country’s wealthiest 20 percent — households making more than $100,000 a year — 38 percent say they would have at least some difficulty coming up with $1,000.

“The more we learn about the balance sheets of Americans, it becomes quite alarming,” said Caroline Ratcliffe, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute focusing on poverty and emergency savings issues.

Michael Thomas is one of those Americans. The 40-year-old Las Vegas resident who works in sales said he’d have to look to family members if faced with having to dole out an extra $1,000 in bills.

“It’d cause a moderate level of stress. I’d have to look at options,” he said, adding that he’d turn to loans if he had to.

Having a modest, immediately available emergency fund is widely recognized as critical to financial health. Families that have even a small amount of nonretirement savings, between $250 and $749, are less likely to be evicted from their homes and less likely to need public benefits, an Urban Institute study found.

“People are extremely vulnerable if they don’t have savings,” Ratcliffe said. “And it’s a cost to taxpayers as well. Lack of savings can lead to homelessness, or other problems.”

Despite an absence of savings, two-thirds of Americans said they feel positive about their finances, according to survey data released Wednesday by AP-NORC, a sign that they’re managing day-to-day expenses fine. The challenge for many often come from economic forces beyond their control such as a dip in the stock market that threatens their job or an unexpected medical bill, risks that have shattered the confidence of most in the broader U.S. economy.

Yet when faced with an unexpected $1,000 bill, a majority of Americans said they wouldn’t be especially likely to pay with money on hand, the AP-NORC survey found. A third said they would have to borrow from a bank or from friends and family, or put the bill on a credit card. Thirteen percent would skip paying other bills, and 11 percent said they would likely not pay the bill at all. Friends Kyle Knauer, 20, and Javier Ramirez, 21, said they’d turn to different sources for the money.

“I’d be OK with it. I worked an internship where I actually made money,” said Knauer, a construction management student at the University of Florida. “I’d probably have to ask my parents for help,” said Ramirez, but said it wouldn’t be something he’d be worried about.

Those numbers suggest that most American families do not have at least $1,000 stashed away in an accessible savings account, much less under their mattresses, to cover an emergency.

Americans’ struggle to save isn’t new. Three CBS News and The New York Times polls going back to the mid-1990s — the most recent one done in 2007 before the downturn — show a majority of Americans would have some difficulty covering a $1,000 emergency. The AP-NORC results also correlate with a 2015 study by the Federal Reserve in which 47 percent of respondents said they either could not cover a $400 emergency expense or would have to sell something or borrow money.

The reasons why Americans don’t save are complex. One economist says it’s a holdover from the ’70s and ’80s, when high inflation ate into the value of money stashed in a savings account. Others say U.S. tax policy rewards saving money for retirement or taking out a mortgage to buy a home over short-term emergencies.

“The lack of (savings) is symptomatic to other financial problems that families are having,” said William Emmons, a senior economic adviser at the Center for Household Financial Stability at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. “Many families are still struggling with debt from the housing bubble and borrowing boom. And the recent economic stresses make it much more likely families are going to be fighting basic financial issues.”

Roberto Mendoza, 35, an owner of Banger Brewing in Las Vegas, said he was taught at an early age to save money. “I was blessed to kind of be taught at an early age to save money,” the Las Vegas resident said.

Mendoza said he has already started saving for Kaydence, his 4-year-old daughter.

“We’re actually already doing it now,” he said. “It’s a good option to have.”

— Review-Journal writer Melissa Gomez contributed to this report.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
VICI Properties looking to expand in 2020

Executives said they’re interested in working with operators that have high customer loyalty, low cyclical risks and the ability to provide services that aren’t threatened by online companies like Amazon.