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Seattle ‘Up’ house could be demolished after buyer backs out

A century-old Seattle house resembling the home in Walt Disney Co’s animated movie “Up” is facing possible demolition, local media reported on Monday.

In 2006, Edith Macefield drew national media coverage when she refused a $1 million offer for her 1,000-square-foot house. The investment company that made the offer eventually developed a 131,000-square-foot retail and office center around the home.

Macefield died in 2008 and willed her house to a construction superintendent she had befriended. The house was sold the following year.

Newspaper website Seattlepi.com reported on Monday Paul Thomas, the house’s broker, said a woman who purchased the home and planned to open a coffee-and-pie store with her teenage daughter there had backed out.

Thomas told local media that bringing the house to code would be too expensive.

“It has become apparent that the age and condition of the house make it cost-prohibitive for anyone to use the house in its current location,” Thomas said, according to Seattlepi.com.

He said the home would either be donated, preferably to a non-profit, or destroyed and the land would be sold.

If a recipient able to move the house within 90 days is not found, the website said, it could face demolition.

In 2009, publicists for the “Up” movie tied a cluster of balloons to the little two-story bungalow to market the Disney-Pixar film about a curmudgeonly old man who refuses to sell his home and flies off in the house tied to balloons.

The movie made more than $700 million at worldwide box offices and won an Oscar for the best animated movie in 2010.

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