PayPal working on ingestible ‘password’ pill

Being forced to remember a gazillion Internet passwords can be a tough pill to swallow, so PayPal is developing one that goes down a little easier.

Literally.

That’s right. PayPal is working to create ingestible pill containing a microchip that users can swallow, effectively turning their bodies into an electronic key that unlocks the service every time they’re near a computer, according to the Daily Beast.

In a presentation titled “Kill All Passwords,” PayPal’s head of global developer advocacy Jonathan Leblanc argued online passwords present a major safety issue and should be replaced by biometric identification systems that can be ingested, injected or embedded in a person’s body, according to Tech Times.

“If there’s a weak password you need to harden that with something physical behind it,” he told the Wall Street Journal.

Leblanc predicts “antiquated” identification methods such as fingerprinting will be replaced by internal methods that identify individual heartbeat and veins, thus paving the way for “natural body identification,” according to the Wall Street Journal.

The password pill would be powered by your own stomach acid, Leblanc said, empowering users to take charge of their own online security.

In addition to the pill, PayPal is also exploring the idea of embeddable silicon chips that would serve as “wearable computer tattoos,” sending information through WiFi, the Journal reported.

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