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What to know if you’re planning to travel to the Northeast

The Northeast woke Tuesday to an unusual quiet. Subways and buses were shut down, and normally bustling commuter spots were empty.

A huge nor’easter blew through the region, causing blizzard conditions from New Jersey to Massachusetts and crippling the ability to travel for the approximately 58 million people in its path.

Airports are at a standstill after thousands of flights have been canceled. Rail lines and roads were closed.

The storm’s hit to New York City wasn’t as bad as expected, and the city’s transportation infrastructure slowly came back to life Tuesday morning. Mayor Bill DeBlasio said, “This is nothing like we feared it would be.”

The city was expected to pick up only 11 inches, but heavily populated Long Island suburb to the east was walloped with nearly 21 inches. Some areas to the north are still forecast to get well over 2 feet of snow when the storm finally stops later on Tuesday.

Millions followed pleas from mayor and governors to stay hunkered down.

Travel analysts at masFlight estimated Monday evening that at least 250,000 travelers were affected by flight cancellations alone.

If you were planning on traveling by plane or automobile this week, here’s what you need to know:

By plane: More than 4,600 flights on Tuesday were canceled, according to the tracker service FlightAware, on top of the more than 2,800 flights canceled on Monday. The three major airports in the New York area were among those most affected. Those cancellations will ripple out through the country and it will likely be days before service is back to usual.

American Airlines and U.S. Airways: American is planning for only “very limited operations (on Tuesday) in the Northeast,” including in Boston, New York and Philadelphia. The airlines will let customers flying to or from two dozen airports in the region rebook reservations made for Monday and Tuesday without a fee. More from American.

Delta Air Lines: The airline canceled all flights out of the three major New York-area on Tuesday after canceling approximately 600 flights scheduled for Monday. Customers were urged to rebook flights, and the airline said it would do so without no extra fee.

Frontier Airlines: Customers traveling from airports in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and the Washington area may rebook without penalty.

JetBlue: Flights in and out of the Northeast were canceled on Tuesday, and customers were allowed to rebook.

Southwest Airlines: The airline said late Monday it had canceled at least 130 flights scheduled for Monday, 300 flights on Tuesday and 50 flights on Wednesday. It said customers traveling to and from the Northeast could reschedule without a fee.

Spirit Airlines: Travelers arriving at or departing from nine airports in the Northeast may reschedule their travel between now and Feb. 3.

United Airlines: The airline had limited operations on Monday and said it would cancel all flights on Tuesday at Newark (a key hub in its operations), LaGuardia and JFK, as well as Boston and Philadelphia.

Virgin America: Travelers headed into or out of Boston, New York, Newark or Washington airports on Tuesday may change their reservation without fees.

By road: The storm is making for slick roads, including along major highways like I-70, I-80 I-84 and I-95. Travel bans put in place Monday evening were slowly lifted Tuesday morning, but in many places, the conditions were still rough. “I am asking everyone in NJ who doesn’t have to drive this morning please don’t. And those that do, please drive slow,” New Jersey Governor Chris Christie posted on Twitter.

Connecticut: Roads closed at 9 p.m. Monday.

New Jersey: A ban on driving in the state was lifted after daybreak on Tuesday.

New York City: Roads, including bridges and tunnels into the city, closed at 11 p.m. Monday but were reopened Tuesday morning. A state-wide ban on suburban counties was also lifted.

Massachusetts: Road closed at midnight, and cars parked on major roads in Boston after 6 p.m. were at risk of being towed.

Philadelphia: Cars parked on major city streets after 6 p.m. were towed.

CNN’s Aaron Cooper, Stephanie Gallman and Rene Marsh contributed to this report

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