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Bob Morris

Bob Morris

Bob Morris is a horticulture expert living in Las Vegas and professor emeritus for the University of Nevada. Visit his blog at xtremehorticulture.blogspot.com. Send questions to Extremehort@aol.com.

Steps help make the most of compost

The ingredients and methods for composting are the same regardless of where you live, but those who reside in the Southwest may want to consider a few additional suggestions.

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Iris corms tend to be late bloomers

In many cases, an iris needs a year or sometims more to get established before it will bloom. Much depends on the size of the rhizome that was planted and how it was planted.

Iris corms tend to be late bloomers

In many cases, an iris needs a year or sometims more to get established before it will bloom. Much depends on the size of the rhizome that was planted and how it was planted.

Use semi-rotten veggies to eat away at pillbugs

Question: I have voracious pillbugs eating my tomato plants, starting at the stalk at ground level.  These are the bugs that resemble armadillos and can roll themselves into a ball. Is there anything I can do to protect the plants or get rid of the bugs?

Beans have rotten time in cool spring

Bean plants could suffer collar rot when springtime weather is cool and causes soil to retain moisture.

Lantanas suffer varying degrees of cold damage

Plant losses due to freezing temperatures involve how low the temperature drops, the time of year the temperatures occurred and for how long.

Garden slugs self-destruct in stale beer

Stale beer works great as a slug bait. Put out a bowl of day-old beer in the garden, sinking it slightly so they can gain entry and then die a happy death.

Compost better than rock dust as desert soil supplement

Rock dust is used in organic agriculture to replenish minerals that have been removed from the soils when growing and removing vegetables and fruit. I tend to favor the addition of compost to our vegetable gardens since our soils are so low in organic matter and its derivatives.

Bottling herb-infused oils too slippery a task

Garlic- or herb-infused oils that are contaminated with clostridium botulinum, the bacteria responsible for botulism, cannot be identified by smell, sight or taste, making it dangerous to bottle or store them at home.