61°F
weather icon Clear

Kids will want to zoom out to pick up ‘Dozer’s Run’

How much do you like to jump?

If you’re like most kids, you’d do it right now if you could. You also like to run and explore which, unfortunately, can get you into trouble sometimes.

And that’s not all. Running when you shouldn’t, could get you lost – but in the new book “Dozer’s Run” by Debbie Levy with Rosana Panza, illustrated by David Opie, it all turned out OK.

Dozer and his best friend, Chica, slept in a barn.

It was warm in there, and was a great place for breakfast — which was something Dozer loved. Just outside the barn, there were all kinds of yummy things to smell, too. Sniffing, in fact, was what Dozer and Chica were doing when a runner sprinted by one day.

And then another zoomed past.

And then someone else, and another person and soon, there was a whole pack of runners! Dozer and Chica watched for awhile, but runners just kept on coming.

Chica was a good dog. She knew that they were supposed to stay in their yard, but Dozer couldn’t resist. Where were all those people going? Chica reminded him about the rules, but he “had to find out what the runners were chasing.”

And so Dozer left his yard. He left his barn, his best friend and even his mom, and he started running and listening to laughter and whistles. It was pretty awesome and the runners seemed to be cheering him on, telling him “Run, doggie, run!” It was so much fun that Dozer ran the other way for awhile, back and forth until they reached a finish line. But once the runners stopped running, the “wonderfulness” ended. Everybody was talking amongst themselves and they ignored Dozer. It was no fun anymore.

But there was a bigger problem than just no fun. A cool morning and a sunny afternoon became a dark evening and Dozer was alone in places he didn’t recognize. Finally, he heard his mom calling for him. She’d been very worried!

It had been a wonderful, tiring adventure and Dozer was glad to be home and glad to see his bed. But something else “wonderful, too” was about to happen.

Head to the bookstore or library and you’ll find a thousand children’s books about a dog. This one, though, stands out from the pack because this one is true.

Levy (with Dozer’s “mom,” Rosana Panza) tells the story of a dog having fun and a community that loved seeing it. This story isn’t just told from Dozer’s point of view, though: they also add an afterword that explains why the run was so noteworthy. That’s something kids will enjoy, but I think they’ll like the artwork by Opie even more; I wanted to reach inside the book to touch Dozer’s tail, and I’ll bet your child will, too.

This is a fun book for kids ages 3 to 5, but dog lovers up to 7 might like it, too. Have “Dozer’s Run” around and your child will jump for it.

View publishes Terri Schlichenmeyer’s reviews of books for children weekly.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Former homeless Las Vegas teen spotlights ongoing issue

“I consider myself lucky because I had a backpack,” he said at a TED Talk in June in Traverse City, Michigan. “And because along the way I found some of the most beautiful, compassionate and courageous people that not only helped me through this time but who have left a lasting impression stamped on my heart.”

Robert Hoge’s memoir ‘Ugly’ is beautiful

You’re having a bad hair day. You feel fat in those jeans. And you’ll never complain again, once you’ve read “Ugly” by Robert Hoge.

‘Cool Nature’ will help young scientists feel smart

Just by looking at them, you can tell what kind of rocks they are and where they came from. You also know a little about biology,astronomy and what makes you tick, so why not learn more by reading “Cool Nature” by Amy-Jane Beer?

‘Cool Nature’ will help young scientists feel smart

Just by looking at them, you can tell what kind of rocks they are and where they came from. You also know a little about biology,astronomy and what makes you tick, so why not learn more by reading “Cool Nature” by Amy-Jane Beer?

Kids will love creeping through the pages of ’Frightlopedia’

Ever since your child has been young, (s)he’s known that you’d be around for comfort when things got too scary. Well, stand by.What’s inside “Frightlopedia” may still leave you on sentry duty.

New Berkeley Breathed book will charm all ages

I have no socks. Author Berkley Breathed just charmed them off me. Kids will love the colorfully wild illustrations and the basic tale of love and friendship in “The Bill the Cat Story.” They’ll appreciate Bill’s underwear and his goofy “ack.”

Engage teen curiosity with ‘Unlock the Weird!’

While parts of it may be disturbing to wee ones, trivia-loving kids ages 12 to adult will pick this book, for sure. When enjoying “Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Unlock the Weird!” curiosity is key.

Summer tall-tale adventure relies on illustrations to spin story

Lies, liars, lying. Your child has undoubtedly heard those words lately on the news, and he knows better, right? But, sometimes, embellishment is oh-so-tempting, and “The Truth about My Unbelievable Summer” is a perfect example.