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There’s all kinds of cute in ‘Memoirs of an Elf’

Your mom and dad take their jobs very seriously.

They get to work on time and they do a good job. Sometimes, they might even stay late to finish a project because it’s important to be responsible. That’s a lesson they’ve taught you because you take your around-the-house jobs seriously, too.

You always do your chores right because people depend on you. But in the new book “Memoirs of an Elf” by Devin Scillian, illustrated by Tim Bowers, an important job is done correctly because Christmas depends on it!

It’s Christmas Eve, a quarter to ten, and Spark Elf is getting antsy. In just two hours, he and his fellow elves Bobbin and Nutshell will help Santa deliver presents. The reindeer are ready, the sleigh is full, and because he feels “so good,” Spark snaps an elfie.

At quarter to 11, with an hour to go, it starts to snow and that makes Spark really happy. It would make him even happier if Santa would hurry up. Santa says Spark worries too much.

And then it’s “launch time!”

Guam and Fiji are first for gift delivery, followed by New Zealand. Santa starts singing his favorite Christmas carol, and he stops to pet every dog. Santa loves dogs, and they love him, but that takes time and there’s none to spare. As Santa plays with a puppy named Tugboat, Spark says it’s time to go.

At halfway around the world and with the bag half-empty, the sleigh starts falling behind. Santa needs to step it up, but he’s too busy enjoying the cookies that kids have left for him. Santa loves cookies — except ginger snaps. Those are the ones he gives to Spark, Bobbin and Nutshell.

Spark would love it if you’d leave more ginger snaps.

With nine hours to go, they finish Mexico City. Four hours to go, and they’re done with South America, so Santa takes a minute to play with the toys. Spark urges him to hurry. It’s almost Christmas morning…

And with a half-hour to go, they finish!

But there’s something left in Santa’s sack. It’s something very important that someone will miss very, very much. Can St. Nick save Christmas in the nick of time?

Oh my, but there’s all kinds of cute inside “Memoirs of an Elf.”

Spark Elf may be my new Christmas hero, in fact, because Scillian gives him a Type-A personality mixed with just the right kind of holiday sweetness. Spark is businesslike and efficient, yet he still appreciates the tiny things that make the Yule cool, and he’s eager to share secrets with kids who are lucky enough to have this book.

But Spark isn’t the only irresistible thing here: I was totally charmed by the illustrations. They made me want to read this book all over again.

This is not your traditional Christmas story, but reading it surely could become a new tradition for your family. It’s meant for kids ages 5 to 10, but “Memoirs of an Elf” is serious fun for anyone.

View publishes Terri Schlichenmeyer’s reviews of books for children weekly.

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