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London police find no evidence of gunfire in subway stations

Updated November 24, 2017 - 10:06 am

LONDON — Two London underground stations on Oxford Street have reopened after an incident that police initially treated as if it might be terrorist-related, the city’s transport authority said on Friday.

“Oxford Circus and Bond Street stations now both reopened and all trains are stopping normally,” the transport authority said on one of its official Twitter accounts.

Police have said there is no evidence that shots had been fired or that there were any serious casualties.

“Police were called at 16:38 hrs … to a number of reports of shots fired on Oxford Street and underground at Oxford Circus tube station,” the Metropolitan Police said in an earlier statement.

“Police have responded as if the incident is terrorist related. Armed and unarmed officers are on scene” the police added.

Witnesses on social media reported people running into nearby shops and pubs for shelter.

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