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Woman arrested for allegedly stomping on sea turtle nests in Florida

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — A woman has been accused of disturbing a sea turtle nest in Florida.

Miami Beach police officers on Saturday arrested 41-year-old Yaqun Lu. She is facing a felony charge of molesting marine turtles or eggs.

An arrest report says officers witnessed Lu using a wooden stick to jab at a nest as she was “stomping” around the nesting area.

The nest was in an area closed off from the public by sticks and yellow tape.

Officers say the eggs weren’t damaged.

Lu is a Chinese citizen who listed a Hudsonville, Michigan, address. The report says the Chinese consulate in Houston was notified about the arrest. Online records showed no attorney listed for her.

Sea turtles are protected by federal law, and Florida laws make it illegal to harm them or their offspring.

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