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Yucca Mountain revival efforts appear dead – for now

Updated July 23, 2018 - 5:09 pm

WASHINGTON — Efforts to restart licensing hearings and store nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain appear dead for the next year after a congressional panel eliminated a funding request from the defense bill Monday.

Trump administration and congressional attempts to restart the licensing hearings and open the nuclear waste repository will likely resume in the next Congress, after midterm elections in November that could reshape the makeup of the House.

The House Armed Services Committee had authorized $30 million to store waste in Nevada in the defense bill, and the House had included $120 million in a separate spending bill to revive the licensing process of the Department of Energy’s application before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Those items were both rejected by the Senate.

A House-Senate conference committee left the authorization language out of a compromise defense bill released Monday.

Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., said he asked Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., to keep the $30 million authorization out of the defense bill. McCain is chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

“Once again, I was able to work to kill efforts in the U.S. House of Representatives to bring nuclear waste to Nevada,” Heller said in a prepared statement.

The House bill included the $30 million.

The House had voted 351-66 to approve the defense spending bill, which included a raise for military personnel, last month. The Senate passed its version of the $716 billion bill in June on a 85-10 vote.

Lawmakers in the House and Senate must now vote to approve the compromise bill, which authorizes Pentagon spending for fiscal year 2019, which begins Oct. 1.

Last month, Senate appropriators deleted a $120 million budget request by the Trump administration and approved by the House to restart licensing at Yucca Mountain. That funding was included in the spending bill for the DOE in fiscal year 2019.

Heller and Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev., urged Senate appropriators to delete the $120 million.

The lack of funding for Yucca Mountain leaves the project at an impasse for the year.

The House and Senate have historically been at loggerheads over the approach to nuclear waste storage.

Senators are seeking more emphasis on interim storage sites until permanent repositories are built. Yucca Mountain, though, remains integral to plans in both chambers.

Congress designated Yucca Mountain in 1987 as the nation’s permanent repository for nuclear waste from power plants and some military generated waste.

But despite $15 billion spent to study the location, a facility has yet to be built on the Nye County site, mostly due to political opposition in Nevada.

Meanwhile, the waste from nuclear power plants, and the Navy, is being stockpiled around the country.

An annual DOE financial report out last month said taxpayer liability for litigation over the federal government’s failure to permanently store nuclear waste has grown to $34.1 billion, a $3.3 billion increase over last year.

“Taxpayers in all 50 states are now liable for $34.1 billion because the federal government has not even begun to consolidate the spent nuclear fuel stranded around our nation,” Rep. John Shimkus, R-Ill., chairman of the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on environment and the economy, said when the report was published.

The House passed legislation this year to streamline the application licensing process and increase the capacity of Yucca Mountain storage of nuclear waste from 70,000 to 110,000 metric tons.

Shimkus had urged the Senate to “quickly take up and pass that bipartisan bill to address this national priority.” However, the Senate has not taken up the Shimkus legislation, or introduced its own version of a bill on long-term storage of nuclear materials.

The effort to revive the licensing hearings will now be put off until 2019 and the next Congress.

Nine rural Nevada counties, including Nye, support a licensing review by the NRC to determine if the geologic repository is safe for permanent storage of waste. Nye County sees a permanent repository as a potential economic boon with high-paying federal jobs and business opportunities.

Contact Gary Martin at gmartin@reviewjournal.com or 202-662-7390. Follow @garymartindc on Twitter.

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