Harter misses point on consolidation

To the editor:

Former UNLV President Carol Harter takes exception to Geoff Schumacher’s Jan. 23 column regarding duplication in Nevada’s system of higher education. She says in her Feb. 1 letter to the editor (“Merge UNLV, UNR? A bad idea”) that Mr. Schumacher’s attitude seems to be “uninformed and essentially defeatist,” that his position is “superficially plausible” and that his position is “seriously flawed.”

Mr. Schumacher suggested that the University of Nevada should be viewed as one university with two branches, thus eliminating duplication of specialty programs. Ms. Harter argues that such an arrangement would be onerous for the “vast majority” of UNLV’s students. As I read his article, Mr. Schumacher is not talking about the “vast majority” of students; he is talking about the students in specialized professional and graduate programs, a small cross-section of students.

It is true that students in specialized programs might have to change addresses for a short period of time, but it would still cost a fraction of migrating and paying out-of-state tuition. Also, distance education is a reality.

Ms. Harter points to other states and argues that states similar to Nevada have been more generous in their support of education and that we should do better. Indeed. But that’s not the point. The point is that Nevada, even in the best of times, has not fully supported the education of our children. In the worst of times, like the ones that face us now, Nevada is not likely to increase its support of higher education.

Mr. Schumacher is on to something. A merger of our two universities could turn two mid-level programs into one superior program, one of national and international prominence. If we are going to make a great university, we need to combine our Northern and Southern resources and universities.

EVAN BLYTHIN

BLUE DIAMOND

THE WRITER IS AN EMERITUS COMMUNICATIONS PROFESSOR AT UNLV.

Happy days

To the editor:

America has been living beyond its means for 30 years. We now have an $11 trillion national debt and trillions of dollars in unfunded liabilities for Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid.

Our budget deficits and trade deficits are now systemic for decades to come. We will continue to borrow or print money, assuring our decline for future generations. We do not have the will to balance the budget, and our debt is growing faster than our gross domestic product.

Our better days are behind us.

ANTHONY TIDEI

LAS VEGAS

Tax burden

To the editor:

Regarding the tax delinquency of President Obama’s Cabinet nominees:

I now know why Republicans complain about paying high tax rates. They seem to be the only ones paying taxes — along with “the little people.”

GARY AFTOORA

BOULDER CITY

Miracle lawsuits

To the editor:

Regarding an Associated Press story you published Jan. 24 on the US Airways “Miracle on the Hudson” and the likelihood of passenger litigation:

Maybe it really was a miracle emergency landing on the Hudson River and not just a demonstration of superb pilot skills.

Perhaps those who experienced that landing need to quit listening to slimy TV lawyers and make sure things are OK between them and their maker.

RICK SMITH

LAS VEGAS

Following the law

To the editor:

Your Tuesday editorial, “Tax troubles,” grossly missed its mark by shamefully grandstanding for an overhaul of the tax code when the real issue in these Capitol Hill tax shenanigans speaks directly to the personal integrity of Tom Daschle and Timothy Geithner.

Anyone from Joe the Plumber to the chief of the Internal Revenue Service can understand basic right from wrong when it comes to our tax system and should recognize that accepting extravagant services tax-free or not paying Social Security and Medicare taxes on certain wages just might have income tax consequences.

These gentlemen had a responsibility to perform their due diligence in these matters, or to speak with a professional tax adviser specifically about these issues if they were unclear.

Yes, the tax code needs reform, but the issue in these cases was the true intentions and honesty of these men chosen to lead the rest of America’s diligent taxpayers.

Eric A. Johnson

LAS VEGAS

THE WRITER IS A CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT.

All hail the king

To the editor

Shades of the Kremlin: President Obama is now capping the executive salaries for those entities accepting federal bailout monies (Thursday Review-Journal).

What about large agri-businesses? Green power producers? Family planning agencies? Auto companies? Ad infinitum.

If you take the king’s coin, you are a creature of the king.

DAVE FAIR

LAS VEGAS

TOP NEWS
News Headlines
Add Event
Home Front Page Footer Listing
Circular
You May Like

You May Like