CCSD principal pushes transgender ideology on kindergarteners

A Clark County School District principal wants kindergartners to consider whether they’re transgender.

Jacqueline Brown is the principal of Schorr Elementary School. Earlier this month she sent teachers a tip sheet on how to create “a more gender-inclusive classroom.” The school district — unusually and to its credit — promptly provided this document in response to a public records request.

“We need to give students the chance to think through why they hold certain beliefs and encourage them to question their thinking,” the first tip reads.

Forget the ABCs. Instead, little Johnnie needs to ponder whether his parents have been lying to him about if he’s a boy.

This is insane.

Elementary school students aren’t prepared to engage in philosophical discussions on topics they know nothing about. Some kindergartners still struggle to make it to the toilet without having an accident, but this principal thinks they should be choosing their gender.

If elementary school students were allowed to make life-altering decisions, they would decide en masse not to attend school. That’s why parents make or direct most of their young children’s decisions. Children are ignorant.

As the tip sheet makes clear, that’s the point. It’s much simpler to brainwash the young.

“The earlier we expose kids to these issues, the easier it is to address prejudice before it become entrenched,” the sheet reads.

Gender isn’t a prejudice that becomes entrenched. It’s a biological fact that’s encoded on every cell in one’s body. But this tip sheet recommends teachers ignore biology and “avoid gender-specific language when speaking to your class.” It also suggests eliminating anything labeled boy or girl, including bathroom passes. A district spokeswoman refused to say if the school’s bathrooms were labeled for boys and girls.

The sheet also included “some wonderful books that have gender-inclusive themes to share with your class.” In one of the recommended books, “I am Jazz,” the title character says, “I have a girl brain but a boy body.”

It is at this point in the story that an adult should have stepped into this boy’s life and explained basic science. Feelings don’t supersede reality. People feel lots of things during the course of their lives. Feelings often change. You can even take steps to change your feelings.

Some children have mental disorders, a category that includes gender dysphoria. Those kids need professional help and sympathy. Sympathy doesn’t mean pretending someone’s feelings can change reality. You don’t treat someone with schizophrenia by telling them their toaster really is talking to them.

Instead, the book glamorizes Jazz’s decision to identify as a girl, talking about how happy it made him. The implication is clear. If you feel a certain way, you are that way. This is a destructive and evil idea to introduce to impressionable kids.

It’s unclear how widespread this effort is in the district. The principal’s emails revealed she adopted the tip sheet from an email she received from a national group. The district declined to make Brown available for an interview and refused to condemn her actions.

Parents be warned. Your children could go to school one day soon and — thanks to district-distributed propaganda — come back questioning if they’re boys or girls.

Victor Joecks’ column appears in the Opinion section each Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. Listen to him discuss his columns each Monday at 9 a.m. with Kevin Wall on 790 Talk Now. Contact him at vjoecks@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-4698. Follow @victorjoecks on Twitter.

Gender-inclusive tips from … by on Scribd

ad-high_impact_4
TOP NEWS
News Headlines
Home Front Page Footer Listing