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UNLV sets premium ticket prices for new stadium

Updated June 20, 2019 - 5:06 pm

UNLV fans will have a chance to experience college football in luxury at the new Las Vegas Stadium when it opens for the 2020 season.

But it’s going to cost them.

The university announced its premium seating pricing on Wednesday with all-inclusive VIP Club Seats ranging from $2,000 to $2,500 per seat for the season based on contracted commitment and seating location.

Those tickets include access to the Field Club with open bar and game-day buffet along with on-site parking, a commodity that is expected to be at a premium at the new venue.

Suites, which hold either 16 or 22 people, will cost between $22,000 to $40,000 per season.

“The goal during our Las Vegas Stadium transition planning is to provide our entire community access to what will be one of the world’s preeminent sports venues,” UNLV Director of Athletics Desiree Reed-Francois said in a statement. “The launch of our Faithful Fan Pricing initiative showed our commitment to offering an affordable option for fans to enjoy Rebel football.”

The Rebels’ inaugural season home schedule includes games against Cal and Arizona State of the Pac-12 among the seven home dates. UNLV also will host the rivalry game against UNR.

Information can be found at UNLVRebels.com/LasVegasStadium.

Prep linebacker commits

Jabaz Myles, a senior linebacker from St. Augustine High School in New Orleans, tweeted that he has committed to UNLV.

Myles tweet

Myles (6 feet, 205 pounds) is the third member of the Rebels’ 2020 football recruiting class.

Statistics were not available.

More Rebels: Follow at reviewjournal.com/Rebels and @RJ_Sports on Twitter.

Contact Adam Hill at ahill@reviewjournal.com. Follow @AdamHillLVRJ on Twitter.

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