N.M. obstetrician suspended over booze, sex charges

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — A New Mexico obstetrician and gynecologist has been suspended following an investigation into claims that he had sex with patients, drank on the job and left patients giving birth “unattended.”

The New Mexico Medical Board voted last week to suspend Christopher S. Driskill from practicing medicine and said he posed a danger to public safety, the Albuquerque Journal reported.

The Hobbs doctor is slated to become president of the New Mexico Medical Society in May.

According to a public notice, Driskill, 42, was having sex with a patient when he was supposed to be delivering a baby. The document does not say where that alleged sexual encounter occurred.

The notice said Driskill “on a multitude of occasions within the past few years” admitted pregnant patients into the Lea Regional Medical Center in Hobbs after they went into labor, but he wasn’t there when they delivered.

When the women were about to give birth, nursing staff tried to summon Driskill, but he didn’t respond.

“On one occasion, an emergency cesarean-section operation was delayed because of your delay in arriving at LRMC,” the notice said.

The investigation found that Driskill also was under the influence of alcohol during work hours and maintained a “personal cache” of booze in his office.

“Your sexual relationships and abuse of alcohol have negatively affected your practice of medicine,” the Medical Board said in its summary suspension notice.

Driskill did not immediately return a phone message from The Associated Press. It was not known if he had an attorney.

Driskill has the right to a hearing before the board takes final action on his license. So far, Driskill has not requested one.

Among other allegations, Driskill is alleged to have entered “inappropriate notations of a personal nature into certain patient medical charts,” and performed a pelvic exam on a patient without a chaperone after informing the patient that one would be present.

The New Mexico Medical Society is a professional organization that represents about 85 percent of the physicians in the state, according to a society official. The organization dates back to 1886. Driskill is a past vice president.

“We really don’t have a comment until a hearing has taken place in this matter,” said Randy Marshall, executive director of the society. “There does need to be due process.”

Asked whether the leadership had been aware of the investigation, Marshall said, “All of that is not of a public nature.”

Driskill, a graduate of Texas Tech School of Medicine, is listed as a member of the board of trustees for the University of the Southwest, a private college.

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