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Death in Las Vegas

In Vegas, some deaths become infamous — VIDEO
 

Thousands die in Las Vegas each year, but only few of them have been widely-known — Pat Morita, John Entwistle and B.B. King, for examples. In some of those cases, their deaths become infamous.

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How Nevada deals with end-of-life spending

From hospital invoices that run in the six figures to guilt that can last a lifetime, the final bill is in every way the costliest of all.

Physician-assisted suicide gaining favor

Public attitudes about the right to die have evolved in the decades since the issue was thrust into society’s conscience by Jack Kevorkian, a Michigan doctor who claimed to have helped about 130 people die in the 1990s.

More adults than children die in the desert heat

Deaths of children left inside vehicles when temperatures climb grip the public’s attention, but in fact more adults than children die from Las Vegas Valley’s heat.

Reputation, reality disconnect in violent death stats

Clark County has mirrored the decline of the nation’s homicide rate in the past decade, with a rate only slightly above the national average.

Solving the mysteries of drug overdoses

Prescription drug abuse has changed how we die, as well as the questions that must be asked when someone dies without apparent trauma.

When death takes a Vegas vacation

Of the 40 million annual visitors to Las Vegas about 1,100 of them don’t make it home alive. But when what happens here means dying, the grins fade to black.

Dying in Las Vegas is a unique experience

Las Vegans put their loved ones to rest in unique ways, such as shooting their ashes into outer space or making keepsakes from their remains.