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Stewart asks for leniency at sentencing

O.J. Simpson’s co-defendant is asking a judge for leniency and the minimum six-year prison sentence in the robbery of two sports memorabilia dealers.

Clarence "C.J" Stewart’s sentencing brief submitted Tuesday to District Judge Jackie Glass sheds light on the maximum sentence sought against Simpson and Stewart.

The brief refers to a confidential state Parole and Probation recommendation that the two men serve consecutive sentences totaling 18 years for two counts of kidnapping with a deadly weapon and two counts of armed robbery with use of a weapon.

The kidnapping charges each carry six-year sentences. Armed robbery charges each carry three-year sentences.

Simpson’s lawyers said they intend to submit a brief to the court before Friday’s sentencing.

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