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LETTERS: Democrats have their billionaires, too

To the editor:

I was so surprised when I noticed that a commentary from the Las Vegas Sun had mistakenly ended up on the front page of the June 3 Review-Journal (“Public more wary of billionaires’ electoral sway”). At first glance, it appears to be a solid piece gleaned from Reuters, attempting to explicate the relationship between billionaires and their sway over elections.

But, as is typical of the left-leaning, liberal (uh, I mean “progressive”) Sun editorial page, the 14-paragraph story leads with and primarily discusses Republican candidates and their billionaire benefactors. Finally, in the 10th paragraph (on page 5A), it is briefly mentioned that Democrats have billionaire supporters, too. But in that same paragraph — one of only two paragraphs that mentions Democrats at all — the reporter points out that George Soros, Alice Walton and Marc Benioff “made small donations in 2014 to an outside spending group” backing Hillary Clinton.

It’s so good to know that those three billionaires who supported a Democrat only made small donations and only in 2014 — and only to an outside spending group supporting Hillary Clinton! Wow. Really?

I believe the story is clearly a typical, liberal-slanted piece, with many obvious omissions intended to once again marry only Republicans/conservatives and the evil 1 percent. But many readers would simply believe that Republicans are supported by billionaires, while one Democrat got some small donations once in 2014. That is simply not factual and certainly not the whole story.

I know it’s a lot to ask, but I would appreciate it if the Review-Journal would guard against the blatant and intentional obfuscation illustrated by this purported news story found on the front page. But maybe it was just an error by the editor.

DARWYN WILLIAMS

HENDERSON

CCSD background checks

To the editor:

Upon reading about the arrest of a bus driver (“CCSD bus driver held without bail,” June 3 Review-Journal), I couldn’t help but wonder if maybe the $100 million allotted by our illustrious governor for English learning in his new tax package could be better used to protect our children with more thorough background checks of Clark County School District employees. This isn’t the first time something like this has happened to one or more of our children, and the excuse is always the same: “We did a background check.”

Well, your background checks are not working. The article also states that there are cameras in school buses. What good are cameras if no one is looking at the video? Something like this didn’t just happen. It has probably been going on for quite a while. Why wasn’t it discovered earlier?

This sexual abuse would be bad enough happening at all, but involving special needs children makes it more disgusting, and CCSD should be held accountable. But the only thing this will lead to is lawsuits against the taxpayers and CCSD moving on with more excuses.

JAMES ANDREWS

HENDERSON

Reporting jackpots

To the editor:

As the IRS proposes reducing the current jackpot reporting level of $1,200 down to $600, where are our elected officials? (“IRS gets earful on changing jackpots’ reporting threshold,” June 3 Review-Journal)? They should be busy speaking out on this issue that will adversely affect the Nevada economy and directly or indirectly all of their constituents.

Congress is supposedly the only governmental body authorized to raise or institute new taxes, but the IRS constantly changes regulations that effectively do just that. Wake up, Nevadans, and call Sen. Harry Reid, Sen. Dean Heller, Rep. Dina Titus and the rest of the state’s congressional delegation, and remind them who they work for. And while doing so, mention the EPA and all the other government agencies that are doing the same thing just to feather their own nests.

DAVID LYONS

LAS VEGAS

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