Kunzer-Murphy not planning to apply to become next athletic director

Tina Kunzer-Murphy, executive director of MAACO Bowl Las Vegas, said today she will not apply to become UNLV’s next athletic director.

She said the timing did not work in her favor with all the planning that goes into the bowl, which is Dec. 22 at Sam Boyd Stadium.

Kunzer-Murphy, who said she was nominated for the AD position by members of the search committee, said she probably would have applied for the position if it had been in the spring.

"It is the right job for me, it just isn’t the right time," she said. "As I’ve said, it’s my dream job, but timing is everything. We all like to say we’ve got a good job, but I really do have a great job."

Kunzer-Murphy said another factor was becoming the first female chairperson in the history of the Football Bowl Association. Her two-year term begins in April.

"I have a great platform for why the college football system is great right now and yet we need to improve it," Kunzer-Murphy said.

Though she’s not on the search committee, Kunzer-Murphy said she would assist UNLV in its search to replace Mike Hamrick, who left in August to become athletic director at Marshall. Jerry Koloskie is serving in an interim role.

"I want to sit there and cheer for the new person," Kunzer-Murphy said. "It’s a very difficult job, and there are some great candidates trying for it."

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