Area Briefing, June 26-July 2


WORKSHOP TO TEACH WOMEN CONFLICT-FREE SELF-DEFENSE

A free self-defense workshop for women is set for 6-8 p.m. July 19 at the Westgate Flamingo Bay Resort, 5625 W. Flamingo Road.

The workshop will focus on escaping attacks without physical conflict.

Donations will be accepted at the door to benefit the nonprofit Can You Identify Me?, dedicated to helping resolve cases involving unidentified crime victims.

For more information, visit simpleselfdefenseforwomen.com or canyouidentifyme.org.

LAWYERS, JUDGES HONORED FOR VOLUNTEERING IN TRUANCY PREVENTION PROGRAM

Volunteer lawyers and judges who oversee truancy sessions in more than 40 valley schools were recognized June 16 at Clark County Family Court inside the Regional Justice Center, 200 Lewis Ave.

The event celebrated the achievements of the Truancy Diversion Project, which involves judges and attorneys volunteering three hours per week to visit schools and meet individually with students to motivate them to attend school and excel in their education.

On a related note, the Eighth Judicial District Family Court recently renewed its commitment to the Truancy Diversion Project by approving $115,000 in administrative funding.

The project, established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002, is funded by Clark County Family Court and is overseen by Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District.

MEASURES CAN HELP PETS COPE WITH EXTREME HEAT

Pet owners can take simple steps to protect their furry friends from the heat, according to The Animal Foundation.

The nonprofit shelter’s tips are:

— Pet owners can be charged with a misdemeanor for leaving pets in unattended cars during extreme heat. Even with the windows cracked and the air conditioning on, pets can die in as little as 10 minutes in such situations. To report pets locked in cars, call 311.

— Bring your pets indoors. Shady outdoor areas are no longer cooling when the temperature gets too high.

— Provide plenty of clean, fresh water. Pets can get dehydrated quickly, and having access to water will help keep them cool.

— Walk pets during the early morning or early evening, when the sun is least harsh.

— Avoid burning your pets’ sensitive paw pads by walking them on grass or dirt instead of asphalt, when available.

— Know the signs of pet heat stroke. Symptoms include excessive panting, increased heart and respiratory rate, difficulty breathing, drooling, mild weakness, stupor/fainting and a body temperature of more than 104 degrees. Pets may also have seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomiting. Animals with flat faces, such as pugs and Persian cats, along with elderly or overweight pets, are more susceptible to heat stroke.

— If a pet shows signs of heat stroke, owners should move it to a cooler area, offer small amounts of water or ice cubes and take it to a full-service veterinarian immediately.

For more information, visit animalfoundation.com.

SAFE BABY-SITTING CLASS SCHEDULED JULY 1

University Medical Center plans a Safe Sitter class from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 1 at the Family Resource Center, 1120 Shadow Lane.

The class is designed for ages 11 to 14 and is set to cover safety topics on baby-sitting.

For more information, visit tinyurl.com/lwu6v8o.

HENDERSON FIREFIGHTERS PROMOTE DROWNING PREVENTION

The Henderson Professional Fire Fighters were set to put on a Safe Pools Rule event June 17 at the Henderson Mutigenerational Center, 250 S. Green Valley Parkway, to promote drowning prevention.

The event was to include a mock drowning conducted in partnership with the city of Henderson. Firefighters planned to perform a rescue during the exercise, with city of Henderson lifeguards assisting. The event also was set to feature safety presentations.

More than 100 children were scheduled to participate from the city of Henderson SafeKey program.

HENDERSON POLICE CITE MOTORISTS DURING SEAT BELT PATROLS

Henderson Police Department traffic officers and other area law enforcement personnel cited 229 motorists from May 15 through June 1 during a Click It or Ticket seat belt enforcement effort.

Officers issued 105 speeding tickets; 43 citations for cellphone use; 48 tickets to motorists with no insurance, registration violations or driving on a revoked, suspended or expired license; and 33 citations for not wearing a seat belt.

Henderson police were joined by officers from the Mesquite and North Las Vegas police departments and the Nevada Highway Patrol for the enforcement.

Click it or Ticket is a national program sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

SITES PROVIDE SHELTER DURING HOT WEATHER

With triple-digit temperatures descending on the valley, shelters are scheduled to be open for homeless people and other individuals looking to escape the outdoors and keep hydrated.

Shelter is available daily during the summer from:

— 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for men at Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada, 1511 Las Vegas Blvd. North.

—7 a.m. to 6 p.m. for adults at The Salvation Army, 31 W. Owens Ave., North Las Vegas.

— 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. for women and children at The Shade Tree, 1 W. Owens Ave., North Las Vegas.

The Southern Nevada Regional Planning Coalition’s Inclement Weather Shelter Program also offers extra daytime shelter options to anyone in the community. In addition, some valley organizations and facilities offer cooling stations during heat waves.

Residents can dial 211 to find the nearest cooling station or visit helphopehome.org.

SPARKY THE FIRE DOG VISITS BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS SITE

Sparky the Fire Dog, the official mascot of the National Fire Protection Association, paid a visit June 9 to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Nevada’s James Clubhouse, 2530 E. Carey Ave., North Las Vegas.

The mascot helped kick off the first day of the club’s summer program, offering an educational presentation regarding fire safety. Firefighters from the North Las Vegas Fire Department also took part in the event.

Sparky was set to be in town from June 9-12 for the NFPA Conference & Expo at Mandalay Bay, 3950 Las Vegas Blvd. South.

For more information, visit nfpa.org.

SUMMER IS SEASON FOR INCREASED VEHICLE AND HOME BURGLARIES

Vehicle and home burglaries typically increase during summer, and police advise residents to take precautions.

The North Las Vegas Police Department offered tips for securing vehicles and homes:

— Always lock the windows and doors to your residence before leaving.

— Make sure to close your garage door.

— Roll up the windows and lock the doors to your vehicle before leaving it unattended.

— Keep valuables out of plain view if they are inside your vehicle.

For more information, visit cityofnorthlasvegas.com/departments/police/police.shtm or call 702-633-9111.

RESIDENTS ASKED TO TAKE PRECAUTIONS AGAINST HEAT

The Valley Health System recently offered heat safety tips.

— Run errands in the early morning or later evening.

— Wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing, a hat and sunscreen while outside.

— Crack vehicle windows for ventilation, and cover steering wheels and car seats.

— Be aware that some medications may cause susceptibility to the heat.

— The very young and the elderly are more susceptible to heat; keep a close watch on younger children and create a communication plan with older relatives and friends so they know how to reach you in case of an emergency.

— Schedule hydration breaks throughout the day.

— Water is the best source to rehydrate your body, and sports beverages can help replace the salt and minerals lost during exercise. Alcohol and soda can dehydrate the body.

Heat exhaustion symptoms include muscle cramping; heavy sweating; weakness; cold, pale and clammy skin; a fast but weak pulse; and nausea or vomiting.

Heat stroke symptoms, meanwhile, include a body temperature of more than 103 degrees; hot, red, dry or moist skin; a rapid and strong pulse; and possible unconsciousness.

For more information, visit valleyhealthsystemlv.com.

RESIDENTS CAN INVITE POLICE TO NATIONAL NIGHT OUT EVENTS

National Night Out is set for Aug. 5, when neighbors gather to raise drug prevention awareness, strengthen police and community relationships and send a message to criminals that neighborhoods are working together to prevent crime.

Neighborhoods and apartment/condo communities can hold events such as barbecues, potlucks, community park movie nights, block parties and child-related activities. Typically, most events take place between 4 and 9 p.m.

To request participation from the Metropolitan Police Department, contact crime prevention specialist Kathy Perkins at k2482p@lvmpd.com or 702-828-4305.

For more information about National Night Out, visit nationalnightout.org.

SITE OFFERS WAYS TO STEER CLEAR OF TROUBLE DURING SUMMER PARTIES

The Rape Crisis Center encourages residents to visit partysmartinlv.com for tips on staying safe during summertime parties.

The site reminds residents that sex without consent is sexual assault. Visitors can learn ways to avoid unwanted sexual situations and watch videos from Strip performers Carrot Top and Criss Angel. Statistics about sexual assault also are included on the site. Tips include:

— Get your own drinks, and never leave them unattended.

— If you start to feel sick or overly intoxicated when you have had little or no alcohol, get to a safe place immediately and call someone for help.

— Always be aware of your surroundings and location, and be aware of security personnel, using them as a resource if necessary.

— If you see something, say something. Be a responsible bystander.

— Make sure your cellphone is charged.

— Watch for red-flag behavior, such as if someone keeps encouraging you to drink or doesn’t take no for an answer when asking you to talk or dance with him.

Site visitors also can download the Rape Crisis Center app Circle of 6, which can alert friends when someone is in an uncomfortable situation.

The center launched the website last year in cooperation with the Metropolitan Police Department and funding support from TAO Cares.

FIRE RESTRICTIONS ADDED AT STATE PARKS

Additional fire restrictions were implemented May 15 at Big Bend, the Valley of Fire and Spring Mountain Ranch State Park because of the high potential for wildfires, according to the Nevada Division of State Parks and the Nevada Division of Forestry.

The following acts are prohibited in the designated areas:

— Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or in an area that is barren or cleared of flammable vegetation.

— Operating vehicles or motorized equipment off of paved, gravel or dirt roads.

— Operating vehicles or other motorized equipment in wildland areas without an ax, shovel and at least 1 gallon of water.

— Igniting fireworks.

— Operating a welding torch or any other device that may cause a fire.

— Building or using a fire or stove outside an established fireplace in a picnic area or campground or places of habitation. Portable stoves using jelled petroleum or pressured liquid fuel are an exception. Charcoal grills are allowed in designated areas but will be restricted on windy or critical fire days. Restrictions will be implemented as indicated by the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Agency and the National Weather Service. Daily information is available at wrh.noaa.gov.

Violations are considered misdemeanors and are punishable by fines of up to $1,000, imprisonment for up to six months or both.

SAFE SUMMER NIGHTS TO FEATURE MUSIC, ENTERTAINMENT AND INFORMATION

Residents are invited to enjoy free entertainment, refreshments, health services and a resource fair while getting to know each other during a city of Las Vegas-sponsored Safe Summer Nights event set for 6-8 p.m. July 18 at the East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave.

Music, children’s games and face painting are planned, and free hot dogs and water will be available while supplies last. Attendees also can learn about community resources, including summer activities for youths, health services, community safety, money management programs and adult education opportunities.

For more information, contact Lisa Campbell at 702-229-5406 or lcampbell@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

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