Fashion goes minimal at EDC

Every Electric Daisy Carnival has its own look and feel — gossamer wings were all the rage one year, colored furry boots the next. This year, however, many women sported a decidedly minimal look. As in barely there, nearly nude or somewhere in between. Pasties were popular, often little more than duct tape fashioned into an X just large enough to cover the areola. Some sported thongs for a cheeky look, others opted for spandex bottoms so short they would make Daisy Duke blush.

Four years in, Allison, 26, Taylor, 24, and Emily, 22, used to make brightly hued homemade outfits, but for their fourth EDC, the trio from Northern California opted to wear all-black micro-ensembles complemented with matching navy lipstick and winged eyeliner.

“It’s just kind of a different environment where you’re able to let go and kind of just wear whatever you want,” said Emily, who like the other two women declined to give their last names. “It doesn’t really have to be about being naked, but it happens, it’s kind of the style.”

It’s also practical, she pointed out on Sunday night, the final leg of the three-day music fest, which, on a 100-degree Las Vegas night, meant choosing comfort over elaborate costuming. For this group, that translated to black-tape pasties, leather bralettes, strappy bathing suit tops and short shorts with skin-baring side cut outs.

Low-cut bottoms, one piece jewel-tone bathing suits and decked-out bras have become just as much a part of the rave fashion for women as the kandi bracelets made from pony beads that stack attendees’ arms.

That’s not to say some men weren’t wearing Speedo-sized bottoms or smaller — they certainly were — but the predominant dress code for male attendees seemed to be shorts and either a tank top or no shirt. It’s the female attendees who, within the festival gates, embrace a stripped-down festival persona, regardless of their real-world identities.

“Before, you’re like, ‘Oh my god, I’m so naked, I feel so uncomfortable,’ but then once you’re here, you’re just free,” Allison says. “I don’t feel like that in any other area of life, you know? Like, I’m pretty conservative.”

Sam Nispel, a 21-year-old from Phoenix, didn’t hesitate about baring it all; one day she wore a black and purple tutu and bra she had affixed with rhinestones, flowers and a bow. The next, she chose a gold bikini, spandex shorts and neon blue fishnet tights. The gates at EDC represent a literal and metaphorical partition between two universes — rave and real — that she inhabits.

“It’s a completely different environment than being outside in the outside world,” Nispel says. “I go to work, and I have to wear business attire, and so coming here, nobody judges you. You feel a little bit more comfortable.”

The EDC environment and culture make the clothing-minimal dress code possible. Throughout the festival, people throw out the words unity, love and respect again and again, not just when talking about standards of dress. What they’re implicitly referring to is PLUR, or peace, love, unity, respect, the central philosophy at EDC and of rave culture as a whole.

“Back in the day, PLUR used to be huge, like, if people saw you making fun of somebody, they would get your ass, it was unacceptable at the raves, like, parking lot’s a little different, but when you’re inside, everybody loves everybody,” Medlock said. “Slowly, as it’s come further and further down the line, with the drugs and stuff, maybe it’s a little more difficult, but with big events like this it’s still the underlying theme.”

In the darkness, among the crowds and throngs of nearly-naked bodies, it’s hard not to wonder if people take advantage of the environment to justify perpetrating sexual harassment or sexual assault. But the answer was unanimous among those I talked to: No one had experienced or witnessed it, not here. That would be antithetical to PLUR, “and a lot of people do know that,” Emily said.

Men note the lack of clothing, sure, but repeatedly insisted it’s not nearly the most thrilling part of the weekend next to the other sights and sounds.

Even people on the outskirts of the Electric Daisy Carnival — namely, the security staff — miss the respect that makes up one-quarter of PLUR, the three women say. Entering the festival Sunday, one security guard yelled, “BOOBS!” at Allison as she walked by. Other times, security staff have clearly taken videos or photos of the women.

“They don’t know, they’re not part of it,” Taylor said.

And, Taylor, Allison and Emily all agree: Some nightclubs they have been to are much worse.

Sure, the culture has shifted as rave culture becomes more mainstream — the three women say people focus much more on their appearance and style than before; Medlock says drug use has become more prevalent — but overall, festival-goers remain open-minded and accepting.

“No one judges you,” Nispel said, adding that that sentiment extends to whatever people choose to put on or take off. “Your body is a canvas, it’s meant to be looked at, it’s meant to be observed.”

Contact Sarah Corsa at scorsa@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0353. Find @sarahcorsa on Twitter.

ad-high_impact_4
Entertainment
Nevada Ballet Theatre rehearses for "Dracula" at The Smith Center
Nevada Ballet Theatre rehearses for "Dracula" at The Smith Center (Janna Karel/ Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Downtown Summerlin hosts its annual Festival of Arts
People crowd to Downtown Summerlin for the 23rd annual Summerlin Festival of Arts in Las Vegas, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018. (Caroline Brehman/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Bellagio, MGM Resorts International’s luxury hotel turns 20
The more than 3,000-room Bellagio hotel is situated on the site of the former Dunes Hotel. The Dunes was imploded in 1993, and construction of the Bellagio started in 1996. It cost $1.6 billion to build, making it the most expensive hotel in the world at the time. The Bellagio was former Wynn Resorts Ltd. Chairman and CEO Steve Wynn’s second major casino on the Strip after The Mirage. MGM Resorts International acquired the property from Steve Wynn in 2000. (Tara Mack/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Recycled Art and Cute Dogs at Summerlin Festival Of Arts
Recycled Art, Cute Dogs Abound At Summerlin Festival Of Arts (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Bellagio Patisserie Creates Life-size Sculpture Of 20th Anniversary Of Cirque Du Soleil Show
Bellagio Patisserie Creates Life-size Sculpture Of 20th Anniversary Of Cirque Du Soleil Show (Janna Karel/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
10 Most Iconic Moments At The Bellagio Fountains
10 Most Iconic Moments At The Bellagio Fountains (Janna Karel/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Jason Aldean talks about the possibility of a Las Vegas residency
Country superstar Jason Aldean discusses his feelings about playing in Las Vegas and says he'd be interested in a Las Vegas residency when the time is right at the iHeart Radio Music Festival in Las Vegas on September 21, 2018.(John Katsilometes/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Block 16 Urban Food Hall Serves Favorite Foods From Across The US
Block 16 Urban Food Hall Serves Favorite Foods From Across The US (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Benny the Skating Dog could be the next Golden Knights on-ice entertainment
Benny the Skating Dog could be the next Golden Knights on-ice entertainment (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Who To Watch At Life Is Beautiful
Life Is Beautiful Setup
Workers preparing Fremont street for this weekend's Life is Beautiful festival, on Wednesday, September 19, 2018. Mat Luschek/Las Vegas Review-Journal
The 46th annual Greek Food Festival will feed 25,000 people in Las Vegas
Madame Tussauds Has The Newest VR Experience On The Strip
Madame Tussauds Has The Newest VR Experience On The Strip. (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Zia Records Move
Zias Records is moving from its Sahara Avenue and Arville Street location to a bigger store. (Mat Luscheck/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Students At The International Contortion Convention In Las Vegas Learn How To Bend And Twist Their Bodies
Students At The International Contortion Convention In Las Vegas Learn How To Bend And Twist Their Bodies. (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Video from Fertitta wedding Sep. 1
video from @wedstagrams of Fertitta wedding at Red Rock Resort
You Can Get Vegan Unicorn Toast In Downtown Las Vegas
You Can Get Vegan Unicorn Toast In Downtown Las Vegas (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Five must-see bands at Psycho Las Vegas 2018
Five must-see bands at Psycho Las Vegas 2018
Zuma's Ice Cube Carving Is Satisfying To Watch
Zuma's Ice Cube Carving Is Satisfying To Watch (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Therapy In Downtown Las Vegas Serves Cast Iron S'mores
Therapy In Downtown Las Vegas Serves Cast Iron S'mores. (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
TOP NEWS
News Headlines
ad-infeed_1
ads_infeed_2
Local Spotlight
Add Event
Home Front Page Footer Listing
Circular
You May Like

You May Like