10 jobs that can bring you happiness

Want a successful marriage? Make sure you and your spouse are happy. Lois Collins of Deseret News National reported that when spouses, especially wives, are happier, the marriage lasts longer.

Part of finding happiness is finding the right job that’ll make you feel fulfilled every day you step into the office. To help you find that happy job, CareerBliss just released its 2015 list of happiest jobs.

To create this list, the online jobs site compiled data from more than 25,000 website users over the last two years. The users were asked on a scale of one to five to define how they felt about who they work for, what type of work they do, the support they receive on the job, the rewards they get, the growth opportunities they have, the company culture and how they handle their daily tasks, according to USA Today.

CareerBliss didn’t put some high-profile positions on the list — like star athletes, musicians and CEOs. This list, according to Fortune, is to evaluate middle-market positions, or ones that are easily attainable by the middle class.

Here’s a look at the top 10 happiest jobs in the United States today.

School principal

The happiest job on the list is school principal, according to the survey. Principals told CareerBliss that their job allows them to encourage others and interact with fresh faces every day.

“Being a principal is a wonderful and rewarding job, however it is not easy and can be very stressful,” Rose McIntyre, an elementary school principal, told CareerBliss. “I do believe it has to be one of the best jobs out there. I love it for so many reasons.”

Executive chef

Chefs make about $58,000 a year, according to CareerBliss. They’re often surrounded by sweet, savory and spicy foods — making every day of work an opportunity to create a new dish and release their creativity.

Loan officer

Loan officers work with banks and financial institutions to make decisions about loan approvals. They average about $46,000 a year.

Automation engineer

We know engineers spend a lot of time in the classroom to get their degrees. But it seems to pay off. Not only are automation engineers happy with their jobs, but they also make about $71,000 a year, which is close to the maximum amount of money that’ll make you happy.

Research assistant

Research assistants don’t make much money — $30,000 annually — but they report a high level of satisfaction with their career.

Oracle database administrator

Working in tech has its benefits. Try an annual salary of $89,000 for starters, which is about $28,000 more than the national average, according to CareerBliss.

Website administrator

Website administrators have a passion for building and creating websites, which is why it makes sense that they make the list of happiest jobs. CareerBliss says most Web masters make about $41,000 a year.

Business development executive

Business development executives get the chance to work with new businesses and help them grow. They make about $70,000 a year, which is $9,000 more than the national average, according to CareerBliss.

Software engineer

Software engineers, who work to design and build software programs, make about $71,000 a year.

Systems developer

Systems developers work a lot with computers to organize their internal systems and make sure everything is working. CareerBliss reports that system developers make about $65,000 a year.

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