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Neon Rebirth

Is Las Vegas a good place to raise a family?

Nationally, Las Vegas is known as the city of slot machines and 24-hour strip clubs. Billboards serve as a constant reminder of all “Sin City” has to offer. But venture off the Strip and beyond downtown, and you’ll find parts of the valley that resemble any other piece of suburban America. So, why do we get such a bad rap when it comes to raising families?

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It was anything but drama-free on the local theater scene in various regards during the recession years. The economic downturn in 2008-09 caused Las Vegas Valley residents to tighten their belts when it came to spending on nonessentials such as entertainment.

Family-friendly Sin City: What does Las Vegas have for kids?

While many family-focused attractions from M&M World to Adventuredome at Circus Circus have remained on the Strip, others have closed, moved or changed focus.

Determined desert dwellers: Construction industry returns to life in Las Vegas

Las Vegas wasn’t alone in the construction crisis. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that more than 60 percent of construction workers displaced by the housing bust either left the labor market by 2013 or found employment in other industries.

Starting a business post-recession: Entrepreneurs share success stories, challenges

The recession’s effect on the gaming and tourism industries also trickled down to impact small businesses around the valley. However, Las Vegans dusted themselves off and moved forward. In 2014, Forbes named our city one of the 12 best in which to start a business.

Beyond brick and mortar: Post-recession rise of nontraditional businesses

Soon after the economy crashed in 2008-09, mobile businesses began starting their engines. The economic downturn was a crucial factor, particularly for the dawn of various food trucks that have since gained momentum and expanded in the valley — in some cases blossoming into brick-and-mortar locations.

Remaking the status quo: How the American dream changed for millennials

For millennials — a term that loosely defines the generation of people currently in their early 20s to mid-30s — the recession hit particularly hard and at a particularly difficult time. Many of them were just entering the job market when it went south, but a lot of them have landed on their feet.