Updated 

New business filings relatively flat in 2013, official reports


New business entity filings in Nevada remained relatively flat in 2013 compared to 2012, according to Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller.

Foreign and domestic businesses dropped 0.6 percent to 56,160 in 2013, compared with 56,492 in 2012.

Still, Nevada has the most limited liability companies and corporations in good standing since 2008, with 291,721.

“When entities are in good standing, that means more revenue for the state,” Catherine Lu of the secretary of state’s office said. “We attribute the number to an improving economy post-crash, compliance efforts during the last year and additional outreach and education to industry groups.”

The number of sole proprietors and general partnerships is also at its highest point since the secretary of state’s office took over business licensing duties in 2009.

The secretary of state does not track the type of businesses created, but the Nevada Employment, Training and Rehabilitation Department identified jobs gains in leisure and hospitality; trade, transportation and utilities; and government year-over-year through November.

Leisure and hospitality leads with 6,400 more jobs in 2013 versus 2012. Trade, transportation and utilities added 6,200 more jobs over the same period.

Professional and business services, the hardest-hit industry, declined by 1,500.

Jobs are up 1.9 percent in Nevada through November 2013 compared with the year before.

December’s employment numbers will be released Monday, though Bill Anderson, chief economist at state employment department, said the industry-growth rankings are not likely to change.

From department data, Stephen Brown, director of the Center for Business and Economic Research at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, identified top-performing subcategories statewide as health care and social assistance; real estate and rental leasing; professional and administrative support; and waste management.

“2013 was a little weak compared to previous years,” Brown said. “2013 is a continuation of the recovery; it’s just not as strong.”

Overall, the state economy grew 2.1 percent, compared with national growth of 3.6 percent.

In Las Vegas, Brown said state government jobs have grown the most followed by food service and bars; health care, with the exception of doctors; and real estate rentals and leasing.

In 2012, top Las Vegas industries were leisure and hospitality, professional and business services and education and health services.

“In 2012 we were the fourth fastest-growing state in the U.S., although it didn’t take a lot of growth to achieve that rating,” Brown said. North Dakota ranked first, Utah second, Texas third and Colorado fifth.

By historical standards, Brown said economic performance in 2012 was low.

Brown said 2013 was a slow year for growth for the West in general. Energy-producing states such as Texas and North Dakota did well, as well as regions with highly educated work forces.

“Prior to the Great Recession, Nevada was always in the top five, quite often No. 1,” Brown said.

The governor’s office of economic development identified health and medical services, business information technology and manufacturing as top trending industries for 2013.

Bob Potts, research director for economic development office, generated the data, which compared the third quarter of 2013 to the third quarter of 2012.

There are 94,222 jobs in health and medical services, an increase of 3,691 jobs, with an average wage of $52,163 per year. Information technology accounts for 50,316 jobs, an increase of 1,546 jobs, with an average wage of $44,748. Manufacturing ranked third, with 39,784 jobs, an increase in 2,284 jobs, with an average wage of $52,848.

Contact reporter Kristy Totten at ktotten@reviewjournal.com or 702-477-3809. Follow @kristy_tea on Twitter.

 

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