Dizzy Wright gives Las Vegas a good rap

Las Vegas isn’t known as a hotbed for hip-hop. But with the city’s biggest rapper leading the charge with a brand-new record label, that’s about to change.

Think of Dizzy Wright as The Killers or Imagine Dragons of hip-hop. The 25-year-old Wright, who recently parted ways with Funk Volume, his label for the past five years, is putting out music on his own, with his hometown firmly in mind.

Wright’s new record, “702,” is setting the stage for his new label, Still Movin’. His goal, Wright says, is to lift the city up — and not just by creating exposure, but by making a real difference in the community.

“For me, it’s more than just signing the artists. I want it to be something bigger than just music,” he says. That includes everything from launching a back-to-school backpack drive to helping feed the homeless. He’d also like Still Movin’ to do things like sponsor basketball tournaments and register people to vote.

As for the music, Wright’s been talking to a few artists, but he’s not ready to reveal whom just yet. Whoever they are, they’ll benefit from Wright’s knowledge and experience and be exposed to an audience that’s already very engaged.

With nearly a million followers on Facebook, Wright has built up a devoted fan base nationally, with a relaxed, confident cadence that finds him flipping between club-friendly party tunes and positive, thought-provoking material with equal ability.

In 2013, fans voted for him to be included on the cover of XXL Magazine, one of rap’s premier publications, for its annual freshman issue, which lists the hottest rappers in the country.

Wright had just been discovered at the end of 2011 by Funk Volume, the independent record label founded by Hopsin, a rapper capable of getting a million views in one day on YouTube himself.

Wright’s stock was already rising, but the XXL nod sent it through the roof. His first album on Funk Volume, “Smokeout Conversations,” was so well received that he was soon headlining a 35-date tour on his own.

In the past six years, Wright has put out a ton of music (two albums, four EPs, and eight mixtapes) and toured extensively. As far as he’s come, though, it’s not nearly far enough. Wright can take care of his kids, but he’s not at a point where he can put them both through college, “which means I’ve got some work to do,” he says.

But Wright’s been working hard all his life. Born in Flint, Michigan, he moved to Las Vegas with his mom when he was 3 and started rapping not long after that.

His mom, who worked as a tour manager for Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, got him started. Inspired by the popularity of Lil Bow Wow and Lil Romeo, she saw a future for her son and pushed him toward it. She wrote some of Wright’s first rhymes and even gave him books on the industry.

Her influence inspired him, but eventually the experience soured him and he stepped away from the mic for a few years. His love for rap was reignited in high school, though, when he met a friend who had a home studio. Wright really started focusing on his music and eventually caught the attention of Funk Volume at a talent competition.

Joining the label took Wright’s skills to the next level. Performing alongside his label mates, particularly Hopsin, whose stage presence was undeniable, pushed Wright to step up his game. He loved being on the label and never planned to leave. But then a disagreement between Funk’s co-founders changed everything.

The dispute stemmed from the notion that the label — which by then had secured a distribution deal with Warner Bros. — wasn’t living up to its full promotional potential.

Everybody agreed that more was needed, but when CEO Dame Ritter spoke with Hopsin, he didn’t choose the right words, evidently, and the rapper felt alienated. That led to the end of the label, which was disappointing to Wright, mostly because he feels like it could have been worked out.

Rather than dwelling on the negative or speaking ill of Funk Volume, Wright is focusing on the positive, taking all of his energy and everything he learned from that label and pouring it into his own.

That’s great news from a guy who’s already given Vegas a good rap.

Read more from Dave Herrera at reviewjournal.com. Contact him at dherrera@reviewjournal.com and follow @rjmusicdh on Twitter.

ad-high_impact_4
Entertainment
Nevada Ballet Theatre rehearses for "Dracula" at The Smith Center
Nevada Ballet Theatre rehearses for "Dracula" at The Smith Center (Janna Karel/ Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Downtown Summerlin hosts its annual Festival of Arts
People crowd to Downtown Summerlin for the 23rd annual Summerlin Festival of Arts in Las Vegas, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018. (Caroline Brehman/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Bellagio, MGM Resorts International’s luxury hotel turns 20
The more than 3,000-room Bellagio hotel is situated on the site of the former Dunes Hotel. The Dunes was imploded in 1993, and construction of the Bellagio started in 1996. It cost $1.6 billion to build, making it the most expensive hotel in the world at the time. The Bellagio was former Wynn Resorts Ltd. Chairman and CEO Steve Wynn’s second major casino on the Strip after The Mirage. MGM Resorts International acquired the property from Steve Wynn in 2000. (Tara Mack/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Recycled Art and Cute Dogs at Summerlin Festival Of Arts
Recycled Art, Cute Dogs Abound At Summerlin Festival Of Arts (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Bellagio Patisserie Creates Life-size Sculpture Of 20th Anniversary Of Cirque Du Soleil Show
Bellagio Patisserie Creates Life-size Sculpture Of 20th Anniversary Of Cirque Du Soleil Show (Janna Karel/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
10 Most Iconic Moments At The Bellagio Fountains
10 Most Iconic Moments At The Bellagio Fountains (Janna Karel/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Jason Aldean talks about the possibility of a Las Vegas residency
Country superstar Jason Aldean discusses his feelings about playing in Las Vegas and says he'd be interested in a Las Vegas residency when the time is right at the iHeart Radio Music Festival in Las Vegas on September 21, 2018.(John Katsilometes/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Block 16 Urban Food Hall Serves Favorite Foods From Across The US
Block 16 Urban Food Hall Serves Favorite Foods From Across The US (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Benny the Skating Dog could be the next Golden Knights on-ice entertainment
Benny the Skating Dog could be the next Golden Knights on-ice entertainment (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Who To Watch At Life Is Beautiful
Life Is Beautiful Setup
Workers preparing Fremont street for this weekend's Life is Beautiful festival, on Wednesday, September 19, 2018. Mat Luschek/Las Vegas Review-Journal
The 46th annual Greek Food Festival will feed 25,000 people in Las Vegas
Madame Tussauds Has The Newest VR Experience On The Strip
Madame Tussauds Has The Newest VR Experience On The Strip. (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Zia Records Move
Zias Records is moving from its Sahara Avenue and Arville Street location to a bigger store. (Mat Luscheck/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Students At The International Contortion Convention In Las Vegas Learn How To Bend And Twist Their Bodies
Students At The International Contortion Convention In Las Vegas Learn How To Bend And Twist Their Bodies. (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Video from Fertitta wedding Sep. 1
video from @wedstagrams of Fertitta wedding at Red Rock Resort
You Can Get Vegan Unicorn Toast In Downtown Las Vegas
You Can Get Vegan Unicorn Toast In Downtown Las Vegas (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Five must-see bands at Psycho Las Vegas 2018
Five must-see bands at Psycho Las Vegas 2018
Zuma's Ice Cube Carving Is Satisfying To Watch
Zuma's Ice Cube Carving Is Satisfying To Watch (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Therapy In Downtown Las Vegas Serves Cast Iron S'mores
Therapy In Downtown Las Vegas Serves Cast Iron S'mores. (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
TOP NEWS
News Headlines
Add Event
Home Front Page Footer Listing
Circular
You May Like

You May Like