80°F
weather icon Clear

Nevada health insurance rates barely changing, on or off exchange

Nevadans buying health insurance on and outside the state marketplace will pay nearly the same prices they paid last year, the state Division of Insurance announced Tuesday.

While plans sold outside the state exchange will see average premium increases of 2 percent, on-exchange plans are decreasing in price by 0.4 percent on average. Combined, that’s a 0.3 percent increase, the division said.Health insurance

The smaller changes are a sign of stability in the health insurance market, following a national trend, state Insurance Commissioner Barbara Richardson said.

“Once we saw the proposed rates, we knew we were moving in the right direction,” she said. Last year, plan rates went up an average of 31.6 percent on and off the exchange.

Rate changes don’t affect 87 percent of Nevadans buying plans on the Silver State Health Insurance Exchange. Those people receive subsidies, which adjust according to premium changes.

But for the remaining 13 percent — and likely some of the 11 percent of Nevadans who are uninsured — premiums come at full price and are largely unaffordable.

Richardson said she thinks new association health plans, available to Las Vegas Metro Chamber of Commerce members and in Washoe and Clark counties through other chambers of commerce, will eliminate some of the problem. Still, few options exist for those in rural areas who make too much to qualify for subsidized coverage but not enough to afford insurance premiums.

“I think that’s what we’re really going to be spending our time focusing on,” Richardson said of rural health coverage. “There’s all types of market stability options that have been proposed for discussion in the Legislature.”

To view health insurance rates for your age and county, visit healthrates.doi.nv.gov/Wizard.aspx. The rates shown do not factor in subsidies.

Contact Jessie Bekker at jbekker@reviewjournal.com or 702-380-4563. Follow @jessiebekks on Twitter.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Developer of Alzheimer’s disease drug to seek FDA approval

Biogen Inc. will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer’s disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment for the most common form of dementia.

Mother receives cancer diagnosis after giving birth

Three months after giving birth, Elaine Arcenas discovered a lump in her breast while doing a self-exam. The diagnosis was cancer. She finished most of her cancer treatments by the time of her daughter’s first birthday, and today Arcenas is a healthy 12-year survivor.

Genetic testing can catch cancer early

When her doctor realized that Susan Wincn had several family members reaching back generations who had been diagnosed with cancer or succumbed early in life, she recommended a new genetic panel that tests for 84 cancer genes. The tests came back showing that Wincn has the ATM gene, which leaves her at a higher risk for breast, prostate, colon and pancreatic cancers.

 
Summerlin-area land sold to health care company for $19M

Intermountain Healthcare, a nonprofit system with more than 20 hospitals, spent almost $19 million to purchase roughly 7.7 acres at the southeast corner of Rampart Boulevard and Alta Drive, near Summerlin.