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Area Briefing, June 11-17

EVENTS PROMOTE NEW 3-FOOT LAW

Area bicyclists joined valley lawmakers and transportation officials May 30 in a press conference to promote the state’s new 3-foot law protecting those who are bicycling on the road.

Drivers must allow at least 3 feet of space between their cars and passing bicyclists. In addition, motorists should move over one lane if they have the opportunity.

The awareness event took place at the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada’s Bonneville Transit Center, 101 E. Bonneville Ave.

Also to promote the law, a six-mile bicycle ride took place June 1 in downtown Las Vegas. The ride included music, prizes and safety marshals.

For more information, visit rtcsnv.com or call 702-228-7433.

PARKING METER INSTALLATION BEGINS

City of Las Vegas officials made the first transactions June 4 with a multi-bay parking meter installed across the street from City Hall on Clark Avenue at First Street.

The transactions marked the beginning of the installation of roughly 233 of the meters in the downtown area.

The solar-powered meters accept credit and debit cards and coins. They will take the place of 1,216 coin-operated meters. Also, about 125 single-space meters are set to be permanently removed as part of the changeover.

Users will be able to print receipts and add time to the meters. In addition, the technologically advanced meters will eventually allow residents and visitors to use ParkMe, a mobile app that shows where on-street parking is available in real time. Also, new signage is set to be installed to ensure that customers can easily obtain the information they need to pay for parking.

Upgrading parking technology is the second phase of a long-term city parking plan to provide good customer service; make parking easy; improve financial performance; support existing businesses by tailoring parking options for customers, employees and residents; support new development by examining shared parking options; and create flexibility for special events.

EVENT RAISES AWARENESS OF HEATSTROKE

Valley safety officials and a parent whose child died of heatstroke sought to raise awareness of the condition during a May 23 event at Sunrise Children’s Hospital, 3186 S. Maryland Parkway.

Participants included the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Safe Kids Worldwide, valley police and fire personal and government partners.

The event, hosted by Sunrise Children’s Hospital and Safe Kids Clark County, featured a live demonstration by the Nevada Highway Patrol showing how emergency personnel respond to 911 calls and assess lock-in situations.

Nevada is one of several states with a high number of heatstroke fatalities: At least 11 children in the Silver State have died since 1998 due to vehicular heatstroke, officials said.

SANDWICH CHAIN DONATES EQUIPMENT
TO CLARK COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT

The Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation recently awarded equipment to the Clark County Fire Department during a presentation at Firehouse Subs, 5905 S. Eastern Ave.

The department received five forcible entry door systems and training materials worth more than $34,000. The equipment will be used to train firefighters on how to forcibly enter locked doors, gaining access to trapped victims in rescue situations. The tools were scheduled to be placed at five county fire stations.

The Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation raises funds through donations from customers.

HOME POOL SAFETY TRAINING PLANNED

Home pool safety training is planned for 9 to 10 a.m. June 15 and 7 to 8 p.m. June 20 at Pavilion Center Pool, 101 S. Pavilion Center Drive.

The cost is $25 for the one-hour program, offered by the city of Las Vegas. Sun safety will be incorporated into the training. Call 702-229-1488 for more information.

INDOOR SHOOTING RANGE
OFFERS NEW SAFETY COURSES

Guns and Ammo Garage announced that it expanded its safety classes with the addition of eight courses.

The courses deal with the basics of carrying concealed weapons and obtaining the proper permits and include women’s-only sessions. Private classes are also available.

The courses are to be conducted in a classroom at 3060 W. Ali Baba Lane.

Guns and Ammo Garage is at 5155 S. Dean Martin Drive. For more information, visit gunsandammogarage.com.

AMBULANCE COMPANY TEACHES
YOUTHS ABOUT WATER SAFETY

Community Ambulance taught children about drowning prevention during a May 23 event at Taylor Elementary School, 790 Coronado Center Drive, Henderson.

Taylor students learned water safety tips from paramedics and toured an ambulance.

JUNIOR LIFEGUARD CAMP SCHEDULED

Junior Lifeguard Camp for youths ages 11 to 14 is planned from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 17-21 at Pavilion Center Pool, 101 S. Pavilion Center Drive.

The cost is $115 per youngster. Upon successful completion of the camp, participants will earn an American Red Cross adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification and learn essential pool life-saving skills.

Participants must bring a bathing suit, a towel, a change of clothes, lunch, snacks and beverages.

For more information, call 702-229-1488.

AMERICAN RED CROSS TO OFFER
TRAINING FOR BABY-SITTING

American Red Cross baby sitter training for youths ages 11 to 15 is set for 4 to 8 p.m. June 11, 13 and 14 and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 29 and 30 at the Pavilion Center Pool, 101 S. Pavilion Center Drive.

The cost is $75 per participant. The class covers child and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation, basic first aid skills and pointers on starting a baby-sitting business.

Call 702-229-1488 for more information.

ANIMAL SHELTERS ANTICIPATE INCREASE
IN NEED TO HOUSE HOMELESS PETS

The Animal Foundation is seeking residents’ help as it braces for an increase in pet intakes due to the warmer weather.

The foundation recently announced the launch of the Foster Project, a communitywide initiative aimed at inspiring residents to open their doors to homeless dogs and cats in need of temporary homes.

Organizers said they hope the initiative will recruit enough foster families to alleviate some of the stresses that shelters and rescues experience during the summer.

Through the Foster Project, 14 valley animal rescue organizations and shelters are offering residents a way to explore different foster opportunities and sign up via animalfoundation.com/project to get involved.

Participating animal shelters and rescue groups include The Animal Foundation, Bull Terrier Rescue Nevada, Colossal Canine Care, Doberman Rescue of Nevada, English Springer Rescue America, the Little Friends Foundation, Paws 4 Love Pet Rescue, PeiPeople Shar Pei Rescue, Second Chance Animal Rescue, Senior Spaniel Rescue Inc., Sin City Saint Rescue, the Southern Nevada Beagle Rescue Foundation and Southern Nevada Bully Breed Rescue.

For more information, visit animalfoundation.com or call 702-384-3333.

OPTIONAL SEWER LINE INSURANCE OFFERED

The National League of Cities is offering a program to city of Las Vegas residents interested in purchasing warranty protection for the small sewer lines that extend from their homes to the main sewer line, the city announced.

Residents are responsible for the sewer line that connects their homes to the city’s sewer system, city officials said. These sewer laterals normally extend from the home to about halfway into the street, where they connect with a main sewer line. The city is responsible only for the main sewer lines.

Residents can expect a letter from Service Line Warranties of America offering the optional sewer line insurance in the event of a line break or other maintenance issues. The city receives a royalty from Service Line Warranties of America, and the program is being offered at no cost to the city.

The warranty covers sewer line repairs up to $4,000, plus an additional allowance of $4,000 for public street cutting.

For more information, contact Service Line Warranties of America at 866-922-9006 or visit slwofa.com.

CONTRACTORS BOARD OFFERS ASSISTANCE FOR VETERANS AND MILITARY SPOUSES

The Nevada State Contractors Board offers an assistance program for veterans transitioning into civilian employment and spouses of active-duty military personnel who are relocating to Nevada.

Military spouses move from state to state more often than the general population and face certain challenges in obtaining licenses to perform their trades, the board said. Veterans, meanwhile, sometimes do not receive proper credit for the work experience they gained while serving their country, according to the board.

The assistance program offers:

n A staff member who is trained to evaluate transferable military training and experience from all branches of the military that meet minimum licensing requirements.

n Consideration of military experience and training when the board evaluates college credits to determine acceptable education levels for license applicants.

n Evaluation of military spouses’ records of licensure to determine whether they are eligible for a waiver of certain experience requirements for licensure.

For more information, contact license analyst Barbara Miller at 702-486-1100, ext. 7814, or bamiller@nscb.state.nv.us.

CAMPAIGN TARGETS ILLEGAL DUMPING

Clark County commissioners and several partners unveiled the Keep Clark County Clean campaign May 2 to boost awareness about illegal dumping and littering.

In advance of the summer flood season, county commissioners and area agencies are seeking the public’s help to eliminate litter from streets, sidewalks and neighborhoods and to stop illegal dumping on vacant lots and desert areas.

Campaign partners include the Clark County Regional Flood Control District, the Clark County Water Reclamation District, the Southern Nevada Health District, the Las Vegas Valley Water District, Republic Services and Outdoor Promotions Inc.

Discarded cardboard boxes, plastic shopping bags, fast-food containers, illegally dumped tree branches, bushes and construction debris get washed into flood control channels and add to cleanup issues after a storm, officials said. The county spends more than $2.2 million a year cleaning up such trash.

As part of the campaign, billboards posted at 30 area bus shelters encourage the public to report illegal dumping to the Southern Nevada Health District by calling 702-759-0600 or filling out a complaint form at southernnevada
healthdistrict.org. Residents in unincorporated Clark County can report complaints to the county’s public response office at 702-455-4191 or fill out a form at clarkcountynv.gov. Residents also can report a dumping in progress by calling 311.

The campaign includes a new section on the county’s website that deals with how and where to report illegal dumping. The section has a list of transfer stations and landfill locations and guidelines on what can be picked up curbside or disposed of at drop-off sites as part of Republic Services’ household hazardous waste program.

For more information, visit paininthedrain.com.

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