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Here’s how land is used by the federal government in Nevada

In the wake of the Oregon standoff that resulted in the death of LaVoy Finicum and the arrest of Cliven Bundy and his two sons, Time Labs examined how much land the federal government actually owns throughout the United States. 

Not only does the federal government own 28 percent of all U.S. land, according to Time, but a large chunk of their ownership is in Nevada, where 84.9 percent of the state’s land is owned by the government. 

Many Nevadans are aware of the statistic, but do you know how the land is used?

(Click to enlarge)

According to a lands summary by the state of Nevada in 2015, the government owned 58,226,015.6 acres of the approximately 70,000,000 total acres in Nevada. By comparison, the government owns the least amount of land in Rhode Island — 5,157 acres of the state’s 677,120 total acres.

Throughout the state, the land is divided between the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Bureau of Reclamation, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Fish and Wildlife Services, Forest Service and National Park Service.

Using data from the state of Nevada’s Public Lands and General Natural Resourse Report, here is a break down of federal land ownership in Nevada by county:

 

Contact Caitlin Lilly at clilly@reviewjournal.com. Find her on Twitter: @caitielilly_

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