69°F
weather icon Mostly Cloudy

Colin Kroll, co-founder of HQ Trivia, Vine apps, found dead

NEW YORK — Colin Kroll, a tech executive who co-founded the HQ Trivia app, has died. He was 34.

The New York Police Department says officers went to Kroll’s Manhattan apartment early Sunday after getting a call asking for a wellness check on him.

They found him unconscious and unresponsive on his bed.

He was pronounced dead at the scene. The medical examiner’s office will determine the cause of death.

“He had so much talent and had accomplished so much at such a young age,” his father, Alan Kroll, told The New York Times. “It truly is a waste,” his father said. “At 34, imagine the things he’d done and the skills he had.”

Kroll was the chief executive of the trivia app, which live-streams short trivia shows to users and became popular after its release in 2017.

The company released a statement Sunday saying their thoughts were with his “family, friends and loved ones.”

“We learned today of the passing of our friend and founder, Colin Kroll, and it’s with deep sadness that we say goodbye,” HQ Trivia said.

Kroll also was a founder of Vine, which was an app built around six-second videos, and worked for a period at Twitter.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
 
Healthy dog euthanized to be buried with deceased owner

Veterinarians and funeral homes in Virginia are rejecting the idea that pets should be buried with their owners after a recent case in which a healthy dog was euthanized so it could lie with her owner.

Trump pledges $16B to ailing farmers; markets sink

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said the first of three payments is likely to be made in July or August.

Foreign election hacking inevitable, say US officials

The hacking of U.S. election systems, including by foreign adversaries, is inevitable, and the real challenge is ensuring the country is resilient enough to withstand catastrophic problems from cyber breaches, government officials said Wednesday.

Texas moves to arm more teachers to prevent school shootings

Texas moved a big step closer to arming more teachers and school personnel as a way to help prevent future campus shootings, under a bill sent to Gov. Greg Abbott.