103°F
weather icon Clear

WEEK IN REVIEW: Top news

The Southern Nevada Water Authority’s controversial pipeline is empty no more.

Nevada’s top water regulator on Thursday granted the authority permission to pump up to 84,000 acre-feet of groundwater a year from four rural valleys in Lincoln and White Pine counties.

That is about two-thirds as much water as authority officials were seeking, but it’s 5,200 acre-feet more than they got the last time around.

In 2010, the state Supreme Court struck down two previous rulings by the state engineer that granted the authority almost 79,000 acre-feet from Spring, Cave, Dry Lake and Delamar valleys.

Opponents vowed to appeal Thursday’s ruling, which they said would be the death knell for wildlife and livelihoods across rural Nevada.

Monday

CRASH PROMPTS CHANGE

The Clark County School District has changed the route of a bus that struck and killed 11-year-old Kaylee Derks on March 16.

Though some in the neighborhood complained of congestion around the bus stop, district officials did not say the route through the neighborhood was dangerous. Instead, they said they were changing it out of respect for the family and the community.

Tuesday

ATTORNEY FOUND DEAD

Nancy Quon, the embattled construction defects attorney who was a key target of a federal investigation into fraud and corruption at Las Vegas Valley homeowners associations, was found dead in the bathtub of her condominium at The District in Henderson.

Police said no foul play is suspected.

Earlier this year, a Clark County district judge dismissed an indictment against Quon, 51, and her boyfriend, former Las Vegas police officer William Ronald Webb, 43, charging the couple in an arson scheme.

Investigators involved in the federal homeowners association probe were among the law enforcement authorities who showed up at the death scene.

Wednesday

OBAMA’S SUNNY STOP

Backed by nearly 1 million glittering solar panels in Boulder City, President Barack Obama vowed to keep investing U.S. tax dollars in clean energy to power more U.S. homes.

The president’s three-hour stop in Southern Nevada was his eighth trip to the state since his election in 2008.

It came as part of a two-day, four-state tour to promote his "all of the above" energy policy. It’s an election-year push to develop both green energy such as solar, wind and geothermal as well as more oil and gas production in the United States.

Thursday

CASINO BOYCOTT MULLED

The president of the national AFL-CIO said a nationwide boycott of Station Casinos is under consideration, but he stopped short of calling for one at a news briefing in Las Vegas.

Richard Trumka, president of the national AFL-CIO, which represents some 11 million workers, was in Las Vegas to lend support for the ongoing campaign by Culinary Local 226, which is leading the charge to organize some 5,000 of Station’s 13,000 workers.

Friday

BROKERS GET PRISON

A federal judge sentenced former mortgage broker Steven Grimm to 25 years in prison for orchestrating a multimillion-dollar fraud scheme in Las Vegas.

A federal jury convicted Grimm and his ex-wife, former real estate broker Eve Mazzarella, in December of multiple fraud-related charges prosecutors said caused banks to lose at least $52 million.

Senior U.S. District Judge Roger Hunt sentenced Grimm shortly after sentencing Mazzarella to 14 years in prison.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
US wasted no time getting El Chapo to supermax prison

A lawyer says authorities have wasted no time in sending the convicted Mexican drug lord known as El Chapo to an ultra-high-security prison where he will serve a life sentence.

House-approved $15 minimum wage has little chance in Senate

House Democrats approved legislation Thursday to raise the federal minimum wage for the first time in a decade, to $15 an hour, but the bill has almost no chance in the Republican-controlled Senate.

Rural Ohio county staggers from impact of opioid influx

The numbers are staggering: An average yearly total of 107 opioid pills per resident were distributed over a seven-year period in this rural county deep in Appalachia.