Switch CEO parlayed small investment in major company

Updated February 3, 2018 - 5:42 pm

For most people, Switch founder Rob Roy exists only in rumor. That is, if you know he exists at all.

In the past 18 or so years, Roy has taken a different kind of Las Vegas hotel — one that rents out space for data instead of people — and turned the idea into one of the technology industry’s largest initial public offerings of 2017.

His company grew from leased space in an eastern valley strip mall to about 4 million square feet of data center space in Nevada and Michigan, with a campus in Atlanta scheduled to open in the first quarter of 2019.

Switch’s data centers house sensitive digital information for more than 800 clients that range in size from startups to Fortune 100 companies, information created by businesses such as casinos, movie studios and video game makers as well as nonprofits and government agencies.

While building the company, Roy, now 48, has stirred enough hearsay to envy the Scottish folk hero with whom he shares a name. What is known — Roy is media shy, a trait expected to soften now that his company has more eyes on it than ever before.

After going public last year in one of the biggest IPOs in Nevada history, Switch received a market value of $4.2 billion, according to Reuters. A nearly 18 percent stake in the company puts his worth above $700 million. People close to Roy say other investments put his worth above $1 billion.

“He has the ability to envision what can be, but then has the practical ability to create it,” said Don Snyder, a Switch board member whose resume includes leadership roles at Boyd Gaming and UNLV. “Those are very special people.”

Roy declined to comment on the record for this story. The Switch founder last spoke to a media outlet around 10 years ago.

However, public records and interviews with those who know him professionally and personally shed light on the man who wants to watch over the world’s data.

Midwest bred

In 2013, Switch posted revenue of $166.8 million. By 2016, the number grew to $318.4 million, according to SEC documents.

Decades before the October IPO that raised more than a half-billion dollars, Roy was a kid who played football and helped his father read computer science textbooks.

He was born Rob Roy Borden on April 26, 1969, in Minnesota to Bruce and Marcia Borden, according to public records. Roy was the middle child to older sister, Kelly, and younger brother, Michael, future president of Switch.

Roy would drop his last name legally in 1998, according to local district court records.

Tragedy forced young Roy to grow up fast. In July 1981, his father, owner of a small construction company, dove off a pontoon boat into Deer Lake in northern Wisconsin. Bruce Borden struck his head at the bottom of water less than 3 feet deep, according to the Wausau Daily Herald. The family lived in Merrill, Wisconsin, about a half-hour south of the lake and about three hours north of Madison.

Bruce Borden, then 36, broke part of his spinal cord and paralyzed all four limbs. Had the break happened higher, Borden could have died, according to the newspaper. Roy was 12.

“Rob is trying to think of the things he can build for his dad,” Roy’s mother told the newspaper.

An auction raised over $3,000, around $8,000 today if adjusted for inflation, toward a van for Borden, according to newspaper stories from the time. In the spring of 1983, Roy’s father enrolled at the nearby University of Wisconsin’s Madison campus, according to university records.

High school athlete

While his father restarted college, Roy was leaving Kromrey Middle School and entering Middleton High School. He graduated high school in 1987, according to Middleton-Cross Plains Area School District records.

In a rare interview Roy gave in 2008 to British technology news website The Register, Roy said he helped his father read textbooks and listen to lectures.

“You’re sitting there in every meeting,” Roy told The Register. “I grew up just being very involved in the whole process. I think I have been 30 since I was 13.”

Wisconsin property appraiser Steve Franken, who attended high school with Roy, remembers the Switch founder as popular athlete who stood out in their class of about 300.

“He was a super, kind-hearted guy,” Franken said. “He was always the guy who took control — a leader.”

Gregg “Doc” Cramer taught English and coached sophomore football at the high school. He remembers Roy’s father on the sidelines in a motorized wheelchair watching his son play linebacker and offensive guard.

“Rob was enthusiastic as well as aggressive on the field but a total gentleman off the field,” Cramer said. “I think highly of Rob.”

Father known as advocate

Roy’s father spent a final semester with the university in fall 1984 without completing a degree. Instead, his legacy would come from years of fighting for low-income housing for people with disabilities.

Borden’s Mobility Store in Madison, Wisconsin, exists to this day. It’s now controlled by the independent living center IndependenceFirst. Borden’s advocacy career brought him the ear of Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson, who also served as health and human services secretary under President George W. Bush.

As governor, Thompson recognized Borden in at least one of the governor’s annual State of the State addresses. He named Borden in 1999 among “bold pioneers who are leading Wisconsin into the next millennium.”

“Bruce was the kind of guy that if he thought he had a good idea, he liked to share it,” said fellow disabilities advocate Charlene Dwyer, now a consultant. “Bruce was the smartest person I knew and will ever know.”

She said she never met Roy, but Borden often talked about his sons. Borden had visited his sons in the Las Vegas Valley using an outfitted mobile home, she said.

Borden died in January 2012 in Middleton, Wisconsin. He was 67.

Larry Ruvo, founder of the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas, is perhaps one of the few people close to Roy to hear the Switch CEO talk about his father at length.

Ruvo, whose own father died of Alzheimer’s disease, said stories about taking care of their fathers bonded the two men. The Roys and Ruvos have dined together, and Roy has contributed his time, money and technology savvy to improving Ruvo’s center.

As Ruvo sees it, Roy’s time taking care of his father formed the Switch CEO as a person.

“He knows what these people are going through,” Ruvo said. “He’s a friend of mine that I admire, respect and, frankly, have learned to love.”

New millennium, new business

Roy left the Midwest to attend one semester at BYU in fall 1987, according to university records.

He met the former Stella Leighton during a visit to Las Vegas and married her in August 1994, according to district court records. He was 25.

Rob Roy
Rob Roy (Neal Portnoy/Las Vegas Review-Journal)

Four years later, the couple and their daughter adopted the Roy last name. Stella Roy’s son from another relationship would adopt the Roy last name in 2011, according to court records.

Switch began in concept in November 1999. He and a now-former business partner wanted to open a building that stored critical computer systems in a secure environment, according to court documents filed on behalf of Roy.

At the time, Roy oversaw a team of about 30 people with Las Vegas home builder Champion Homes, the company behind Champion Village in Henderson and Iron Mountain Ranch in the northwestern valley.

He and business partner Phil Ohler met through their wives at a party, Ohler said.

Roy and Ohler toured a data center in Los Angeles and decided to bring their idea to life, according to court documents. Champion Homes would file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in December 1999. The next month, Roy started working with data centers full time.

Roy’s mission — find investors and property. He put $20,000 of his own money toward the company and raised $433,000 for investors who held a 40 percent stake in the company, according to court records.

Roy owned 30 percent of the business, according to court documents filed on behalf of Roy. Ohler owned 25 percent. Roy’s brother, Mike Borden, owned 5 percent.

By August 2000, the first customers had installed computer systems in the partners’ business. The business leased less than 10,000 square feet of space in a strip mall near Sahara Avenue and Lamb Boulevard.

That month, Ohler described the security within the steel-lined building in an interview with Nevada Business magazine about the company — Colocation Gateways.

Visitors needed swipe cards. Scanners verified fingerprints.

Compared to the military-grade security Switch is known for today, the human security at Colocation Gateways was Roy, Ohler and Roy’s brother checking on the building once a day.

But the partnership died quickly. By October, Ohler had sued Roy in district court. Ohler wanted at least $300,000.

Messy split

Ohler accused Roy of stealing at least $45,000 from the company account and changing the codes to the Sahara building, locking Ohler out, according to court documents.

Roy countersued and asked for at least $10,000 from Ohler. Roy accused Ohler of stealing a business computer, billing software, records and a gun from the office, according to court documents. Roy alleges Ohler never returned Roy’s calls, that he missed his scheduled site visits and that he asked customers for a job.

The court dismissed both lawsuits in May 2001. Roy had just turned 32.

Two years later, Roy restarted the business under the name Switch. Today, Ohler and his wife run Solidifi, a communication services company that provides design and installation services.

Ohler said in an interview he’s followed the growth of Switch over the years.

“We had our baby together,” Ohler said. “He raised our child.”

Switch has maintained Ohler had no influence or significant role in the founding of Roy’s business.

From the rubble of Enron

Before Switch became reality, energy giant Enron made a $1 billion investment in Southern Nevada. A few years later, the company collapsed.

Review-Journal articles from 2006 and 2011 described how Houston-based Enron invested that money into a building atop fiber optic cables less than a mile east of the strip mall that housed Colocation Gateways.

Enron finished the building in 1998. By December 2001, about seven months after end of Colocation Gateways, Enron would file one of the largest corporate bankruptcies in U.S. history.

Whoever owned the building would have the technology to send the entire Library of Congress anywhere in the world in minutes and stream video to the all of California, according to a 2004 KNPR program. Sales managers told KNPR that only Roy showed to the Enron auction despite representatives marketing to 300 information technology companies over three months.

Enron sold the property in January 2003 to companies managed by early Switch investors Scott Gragson and William Balelo for $930,000, according to county property records.

Influence grows

Over time, Roy’s life improved.

In July 2004, he sold the Henderson house near Fox Ridge Park that he’d lived in since at least 1999 for about $310,000. Four months later, he bought a two-story house in the southern valley, near Cactus Avenue and Southern Highlands Parkway, for $861,000, according to county records.

In 2007, he paid $220,000 for a townhouse about a mile away. Between 2011 and 2017, he paid more than $1 million each for three houses near Southern Highlands Golf Club.

Roy’s signature changed over time as well. He left the large first letters of “Rob R. Borden” signed to his 1999 marriage license in favor of a “Rob Roy” so squished that on some documents it resembles a flat line.

Roy spoke out from time to time on issues that concerned him. In a 2004 Review-Journal story, Roy said high-tech companies need tax credits to help pay for research and development of new technologies.

“On the R&D side, you need to do something wrong 30 times before you get it right,” Roy told the Review-Journal.

Around 2005, Roy met former Boyd Gaming executive Don Snyder and recruited him to the board. In an interview, Snyder said Roy’s intellect and big name clients helped convince him to join the company.

“I have the highest respect for Rob and his creative ability,” Snyder said. “He’s clearly one of the brightest people I’ve ever met.”

Snyder brought Roy on as one of about 60 founders of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts. The title means Roy contributed at least $1 million to the project, which opened in March 2012.

Roy has continued to help the center with technology needs, improving its broadcast power and even helping land a company to set up the phone system, Smith Center CEO Myron Martin said.

“As far as I’m concerned, the guy’s a rock star,” Martin said. “He’s being an ambassador to the city.”

In 2014, Roy, Snyder and board member Bryan Wolf helped bring a supercomputer to Las Vegas from Wolf’s employer, Intel. The goal of the supercomputer is to recruit more faculty to UNLV, help students and land significant research grants.

Eyes on Switch

The hall to Roy’s office nowadays displays drawn versions of employees made to look like comic book heroes.

Roy’s office is lit in red with furniture he made himself. He sits in front of multiple monitors, flanked on either side by statues more than 6 feet tall of the titular villains from the “Alien” and “Predator” series of movies, comics and video games. Behind him, a dashboard of buttons lets him open and close doors without leaving his seat.

Models of characters from science fiction and comic books line the shelves, as well as drawings from his adult-age children, son Chad and daughter Natasha.

Less than 5 percent of Switch’s customers are in the Las Vegas area. As such, the company’s challenge is recruiting clients from higher tier data center markets such as San Francisco, Dallas and Ashburn, Virginia.

Switch is a company to watch, even with its unusual traits, said Jabez Tan, a data center research director at the Structure Research consulting firm. Not many data center companies arm ex-military guards to protect its data. The places where Switch has built — Las Vegas, Reno and Grand Rapids, Michigan — are not considered popular areas for data centers.

Though other data center companies have a presence in the valley, Switch’s dominance has sent other service providers to more competitive places like Arizona, Tan said. The Switch campus in Atlanta will be the company’s first foray into a more competitive market.

Snyder, the board member, said he isn’t worried about more competition the more Switch builds outside its home.

“Rob is thinking years in front of where we are today,” Snyder said. “We are so far ahead of competition.”

Contact Wade Tyler Millward at wmillward@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-4602. Follow @wademillward on Twitter.

Local Videos
Dog Yoga At Hydrant Club
The Hydrant Club in downtown Las Vegas, is a social club for dogs and their people. Recently the club started hosting dog yoga. (Mat Luschek/Review-Journal)
Butterflies At The Springs Preserve
The butterfly habitat is now open at the Springs Preserve. Learn about butterflies and take in the peaceful surroundings. (Mat Luschek / Review-Journal)
The Bellagio Conservatory's spring display has a Japanese theme
The Bellagio's conservatory is hosting around 65,000 flowers, to form a Japanese theme this spring. (Mat Luschek / Review-Journal)
Bonnie Springs closes (Caroline Brehman/Kimber Laux)
Bonnie Springs Ranch near Las Vegas officially closed its gates Sunday, March 17, 2019. (Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Honoring a fallen North Las Vegas Police officer at his namesake school
The 20th Annual Raul P. Elizondo Honor Day celebrates the fallen North Las Vegas Police officer's legacy at his namesake school. (K.M. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhoto
Windy day in Las Vegas Valley
The Review-Journal's camera on the under-construction Las Vegas Stadium the was buffered by high winds on Wednesday, March 14, 2019. (Las Vegas Review-Journal)
March gloom falls on Las Vegas
After a rainy overnight, gloomy skies hover over Las Vegas Tuesday morning. (Mat Luschek/Review-Journal)
John Katsilometes gets his head shaved at St. Baldrick's
Las Vegas Review-Journal man-about-town columnist John Katsilometes gets his head shaved by former Las Vegas Mayor Oscar Goodman during St. Baldrick's Foundation shave-a-thon on the Brooklyn Bridge at New York-New York in Las Vegas Friday, March 8, 2019. (K.M. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhoto
The Blue Angels take flight over Las Vegas Strip
The Blue Angels’ U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron flew their signature Delta formation over a part of the Las Vegas Strip, McCarran International Airport and east Las Vegas and were scheduled to fly over Hoover Dam. (Michael Quine/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Vegas88s
Gross World Records
A group of about 20 children gathered around a TV at Sahara West Library on Feb. 27 for a history lesson on the most disgusting world records.
Graduation for Renewing HOPE program
The Renewing HOPE program graduation for homeless who spend nine months in Catholic Charities program. Graduates are preparing to enter the workforce. (Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @bizutesfaye
Car crashes into Starbucks near Las Vegas Strip
Lt. William Matchko of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police gives details about a car crashing into a Starbucks at Sahara Avenue and Paradise Road, near the Las Vegas Strip, on Friday, March 1, 2019. (Jessica Terrones/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Car crashed into PT’s Gold
A 60-year-old man who police believe was impaired drove into a PT’s Gold at Silverado Ranch and Decatur boulevards Thursday night, Metropolitan Police Department Lt. William Matchko said. The driver was hospitalized and is expected to survive. A man inside the bar was hit by debris but drove himself to the hospital, Matchko said. (Katelyn Newberg/ Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Driver crashes vehicle into PT’s tavern in south Las Vegas (part 1)
A driver suspected of impairment crashed a vehicle into the wall of a PT’s Gold tavern, at 4880 W. Silverado Ranch Blvd., in Las Vegas on Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019. (Katelyn Newberg/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Driver crashes vehicle into PT’s tavern in south Las Vegas (pullout)
A driver suspected of impairment crashed a vehicle into the wall of a PT’s Gold tavern, at 4880 W. Silverado Ranch Blvd., in Las Vegas on Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019. (Katelyn Newberg/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Kids Read Books To Dogs At The Animal Foundation In Las Vegas
Kids from local Las Vegas elementary schools took part, Thursday, in a program at the Animal Foundation, where they read books to dogs. (Mat Luschek/Review-Journal)
Pioneer Trail highlights historic locations in West Las Vegas
The Pioneer Trail, a 16-site route of historically significant locations in Las Vegas, starts at the Springs Preserve and snakes east until it reaches above the brim of downtown. (Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @bizutefsya
Vegas Warm Weather Hits Las Vegas Valley
Between Feb. 20-21, parts of the Las Vegas Valley were hit with 7.5" of snow. Less than a week later, it was sunny with temperatures in the 70s. (Mat Luschek/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Dr. S. Jay Hazan, a World War II veteran, talks about his arrest at the VA Hospital
Dr. S. Jay Hazan, a World War II Army veteran, was arrested in November after he caused a ruckus at the VA Hospital in North Las Vegas and stole his driver's car keys. He was arraigned on Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019, and the charges will be dropped after 60 days. (Bizuayehu Tesfaye/ Las Vegas Review-Journal) @bizutesfaye
Claytee White talks about Black History Month
An interview with Claytee White, director of the Oral History Research Center at UNLV. (Benjamin Hager/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Reflecting on the Moulin Rouge and a segregated Vegas
Former employees of the Moulin Rouge, the first integrated hotel-casino in Nevada, talk about what it was like in the brief six months the casino was open. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Las Vegas home prices
Home prices rose in every ZIP code in the Las Vegas Valley in 2018 for the second year in a row, according to SalesTraq. Prices grew fastest in older, more centrally located areas. But prices were highest in the suburbs. The top three ZIP codes for price growth were 89119 (29.8%), 89146 (25%) and 89030 (24.6%). The top three ZIP codes for median sales prices were 89138 ($464,500), 89135 ($420,500) and 89052 ($370,000).
Wagonwheel Drive overpass reopens after ice closure
Overpass at Wagonwheel Drive reopens after ice on the onramp caused the ramp to be shut down, Feb. 22, 2019. (Michael Quine/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Keeping warm at the city of Las Vegas’ homeless courtyard
With help from the city of Las Vegas, a Salvation Army shelter stays open during the day Thursday and Friday, offering a safe place for the homeless to find respite from freezing temperatures and snow. (Chase Stevens/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Sloppy, Slushy Road Conditions Lead to Slow Traffic
Traffic slowed to a crawl on Jones are near Russell as conditions worsened Thursday. (Mat Luschek/Review-Journal)
Winter storm blankets west side of Las Vegas Valley
On Wednesday evening through early Thursday a winter storm dumped more than 7 1/2 inches of snow on some parts of the Las Vegas Valley. (Michael Quine/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Las Vegas snow day for children
Las Vegas kids play in the snow that fell on Feb. 21, 2019. (Belinda Englman/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Snow closes Red Rock Canyon, residents enjoy rare snowfall
The greater Las Vegas area was hit with snowfall on Thursday, Feb. 22, 2019. This video shows the areas surrounding Red Rock Canyon and the Summerlin community. Video by: Heidi Fang/Las Vegas Review-Journal
Las Vegas kids attend school in the snow
Las Vegas children attend school during a rare snowstorm on Feb. 21, 2019. Staton Elementary School and other CCSD schools remained open. (Glenn Cook/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
People enjoying the snow in Summerlin
Fox Hill Park in Summerlin was busy Thursday morning, Feb. 21, 2019, with people enjoying the rare snow that fell overnight. (Mat Luschek/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
It is a rainy Valentine's Day in Las Vegas - Video
These scenes come from the Las Vegas Stadium LiveCam (Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Business Videos
Impact of parking fees on visiting the Las Vegas Strip
There are no data showing a relationship between Strip resort and parking fees and the number of out-of-state visitors to Las Vegas. But there are data showing a relationship between Strip parking fees and the number of local visitors to the the Strip. ‘’As a local, I find myself picking hotels I visit for dinner or entertainment, based on whether they charge for parking or not,”’ said David Perisset, the owner of Exotics Racing. ‘’It is not a matter of money, more of principle.’’ A 2018 survey by the Las Vegas Global Economic Alliance found 36.9 percent of Clark County residents reported avoiding parking at Strip casinos that charge for parking. 29.1 percent reported avoiding using any services from a Strip casino that charges for parking.
MGM's sports betting deals
MGM Resorts International signed a sports betting sponsorship agreement with the NBA in July It was the first professional sports league to have official ties with a legal sports betting house. The deal came just two months after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a law prohibiting sports betting in most states. In October, MGM became the first gaming company to sign a sports betting partnership with the NHL. In November, MGM became the first gaming company to sign a sports betting partnership with the MLB. Financial terms of Tuesday’s deal and earlier partnerships have not been announced.
Faraday puts Las Vegas land on the market
Nearly two years after Faraday Future bailed on its North Las Vegas auto factory, the company has put its land up for sale. (Michael Quine/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
El Cortez owner Kenny Epstein on running the iconic property
Kenny Epstein, owner of the El Cortez Hotel in downtown Las Vegas, talks about Jackie Gaughan mentorship and answers rumors about bodies in the basement at the mob-era casino. (K.M. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhoto
LVCVA recommends construction of underground people mover
The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority announced the recommendation for an underground people mover for the convention center. The system would have the potential to expand and connect Downtown and the resort corridor all the way to McCarran. (Michael Quine/ Las Vegas Review-Journal)
LVCVA/Boring Company Press Conference
The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority announced a collaboration with Elon Musk's The Boring Company to develop and operate an autonomous people mover system for the Las Vegas Convention Center District.
International Pizza Expo includes green and gluten free
The International Pizza Expo at Las Vegas Convention Center included companies focused on vegan and gluten free, and plant-based pizza boxes. (K.M. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhoto
International Pizza Expo kicks off in Las Vegas
The first day of the International Pizza Expo at Las Vegas Convention Center is everything Pizza. (K.M. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhoto
T-Mobile program aids guests with sensory needs
A program at T-Mobile Arena is designed to provide a more sensory friendly experience for guests.
Photo Booth Expo
Danielle May talks about how Simple Booth transformed her Volkswagen bus into a business.
Nevada Gaming Commission's highest fines
The highest fines assessed by the Nevada Gaming Commission, according to commission Chairman Tony Alamo: 1) Wynn Resorts Ltd., $20 million, 2019 2) CG Technology (then known as Cantor G&W Holdings), $5.5 million, 2014 3) The Mirage, $5 million ($3 million fine, $2 million compensatory payment), 2003 4) Stardust, $3 million, 1985 5) Santa Fe Station, $2.2 million ($1.5 million fine, $700,000 compensatory payment), 2005 6) Las Vegas Sands, $2 million, 2016 7) CG Technology, $1.75 million, 2018 8) CG Technology, $1.5 million (also $25,000 in escrow for underpaid patrons), 2016 9) Caesars Entertainment, $1.5 million, 2015 10) Imperial Palace, $1.5 million, 1989 11) Peppermill Casinos, $1 million, 2014
Tiny Pipe Home vs Shipping Crate
A Tiny pipe home was displayed at the International Builders Show this week in Las Vegas.
Auto repair shortage affects Las Vegas
The auto repair industry is facing a national shortage of workers.
Franchising industry booming
Experts say Las Vegas is a hotbed for the franchise industry.
Africa Love owner talks about his store in Las Vegas
Mara Diakhate, owner of Africa Love, gift and decor store, talks about his store in Las Vegas. (Bizuayehu Tesfaye/ Las Vegas Review-Journal) @bizutesfaye
Developer gets approval to build homes at Bonnie Springs
The Clark County Planning Commission has approved a plan to build 20 homes on the site of Bonnie Springs Ranch. (Michael Quine/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Dig This opens new location In Las Vegas
Remember when you were a kid and played with construction toys in the sand box? Dig This Las Vegas has the same idea, except instead of toy bulldozers, you get to play with the real thing. (Mat Luschek/Review-Journal)
Town Square developer Jim Stuart building again in Las Vegas
Las Vegas’ real estate bubble took developers on a wild ride, something Jim Stuart knows all too well. (Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Salon opens at Veterans Village
T.H.E. Salon, owned by Nicole Christie, celebrated their opening at the Veterans Village with a ribbon cutting ceremony.
Southwest Airlines considering Las Vegas-Hawaii flights
Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly says the airline is "very focused" on Hawaii. Hawaiians have a strong presence in Las Vegas.The city’s unofficial status is “Hawaii’s ninth island.” In 2018, at least 2,958 people from Hawaii moved to Nevada. Of those, 88.7 percent moved into Clark County, according to driver license surrender data. According to the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, 310,249 people came to Las Vegas from Hawaii in 2018.
Fewer Nevadans are celebrating Valentine's Day
Fewer Nevadans are celebrating Valentine's Day. About 1.2 million Nevadans are expected to celebrate this year, a 5 percent drop from 2018. A growing number of people consider Valentine’s Day over-commercialized. Others weren’t interested in the holiday or had nobody to celebrate with. But spending is expected to rise. Those who do celebrate are buying for more people. The average American is expected to spend about $162 this year for Valentine’s Day, a 57 percent jump from a decade prior. Katherine Cullen, director of industry and consumer insights at NRF
Foreclosures of mansions in Las Vegas
Las Vegas was ground zero for America's foreclosure crisis after the housing bubble burst. (Eli Segall/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Rick Helfenbein talks about the impact of tariffs on the clothing industry
MAGIC fashion convention showcases men's clothing trends
The MAGIC fashion convention has come to Las Vegas at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center to showcase some of the hottest clothing trends for men. (Nathan Asselin/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Allegiant Air flight attendants learn how to handle a water landing
Field instructor Ashleigh Markel talks about training prospective flight attendants for Allegiant Air getting live training with a raft for a water landing at the Heritage Park Aquatic Complex in Henderson on Monday. (John Hornberg/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Smith & Wollensky CEO Michael Feighery speaks
Smith & Wollensky CEO Michael Feighery speaks about the new Smith & Wollensky restaurant coming to the Grand Canal Shoppes at The Venetian in Las Vegas.
Smith & Wollensky CEO Michael Feighery speaks
Smith & Wollensky CEO Michael Feighery speaks about the new Smith & Wollensky restaurant coming to the Grand Canal Shoppes at The Venetian in Las Vegas.
Smith & Wollensky CEO Michael Feighery talks about Las Vegas return
Michael Feighery, CEO of Smith & Wollensky Restaurant Group, discusses the restaurant's upcoming return to the Las Vegas Strip.
Apartments to Come to Hughes Center
Developer Eric Cohen discusses his current building project at the Hughes Center office park in Las Vegas, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. Caroline Brehman/Las Vegas Review-Journal
Stratosphere to rebrand to The STRAT
The Stratosphere, a 1,150-foot-tall property in Las Vegas will be renamed The STRAT Hotel, Casino and Skypod.
TOP NEWS
Home Front Page Footer Listing