After experimenting with its sound, Thursday returns to rawness of earlier efforts

The album was called "Full Collapse," and it would portend the opposite of what its title implied.

The 2001 sophomore release from post-punk agitant Thursday sounded like a call to arms: Frontman Geoff Rickly swung like a sweaty pendulum between vehemence and vulnerability via a pained whelp that sounded as if he was singing barefoot atop a mound of broken glass.

"I don’t want to feel this way forever," he testified on the album’s breakout single, "Understanding in a Car Crash." "A dead letter marked return to sender."

Over cresting guitars and triumphant-sounding, arms-in-the-air choruses, the band quickly became the new face of the sensitive side of the Warped Tour ranks, its tunes confessional and cathartic, punk’s soft, emotional underbelly outfitted with a hard outer shell.

Soon, Thursday was being courted by various major labels who saw the band as the new flag bearers for the disenchanted, disaffected iGeneration.

"There was a time right after ‘Full Collapse’ where we had gained our audience, but then there were people who were like, ‘Oh, they’re going to be this next big thing,’ " drummer Tucker Rule recalls, sounding relieved that the moment has passed. "That was when it was really hard, really strange. The expectations were unreal. We were never going to be that band."

But they did give it a good try.

The band released a pair of solid-selling albums on major label Island Records, the second of which, 2006’s "A City By the Light Divided," saw Thursday pushing hard against the bounds of its sound, incorporating lots of texture and atmosphere in the form of ashen synth lines and an undercurrent of electronics.

The band strayed a bit from the visceral, heart-in-the-throat bloodletting that once defined it.

On their new disc, "Common Existence," released earlier this week, they sought a return to the immediacy of some of their earlier efforts.

"We knew that on ‘A City By the Light Divided,’ we went in a really weird direction, doing a lot of experimenting," Rule says. "I feel like on this record, we still wanted to have that experimental vibe, but we also wanted to reach back to the old, old days of Thursday, when everything was very immediate, in your face, but melodic. We wanted to capture that raw thing that we had a long time ago, when we were young kids writing music."

The disc does pulse with a youthful willfulness and a just-guzzled-a-case-of-Red Bull adrenaline burst.

"I was dead, now I’m back to life," Rickly sings on the first single, "Resuscitation of a Dead Man," a reinvigorated rebel yell that’s as business-minded and to-the-point as a bullet fired from a gun.

The album still has plenty of the digital flourishes of its predecessor — like "City," it’s a good headphones record with a very detailed mix full of little sprinkles of sound tucked away around this corner or the next — but it’s also a more heated, confrontational disc where the band attempts to grab listeners directly by the throat.

A large part of this new infusion of energy is attributable to the band’s returning to the indie ranks by signing with veteran punk label Epitaph Records.

"The label started out D.I.Y., and it still is that way," Rule notes. "There’s a sense of community and an understanding of everybody moving together towards one thing. If you’re on a major label, they may have an agenda, but it’s all about money and moving units, as they say. This is more about understanding that, ‘Hey, this band may not be huge, but they do have a following.’ "

Clearly, then, this bunch feels like underdogs again, and this pays dividends on "Existence." They seem less concerned with the promise of tomorrow and more fixated on the struggles of today.

They’re no longer kids — though they’re trying harder than ever to reach them.

"Most of us are over 30 now, so we’re not the young band anymore, we’re not the young kids on the block," Rule says. "We have that mentality that we want to come in and prove that we have the energy, that we can come back and be a constant for young people to older people. It’s time for us to come back in and do what we do."

Contact reporter Jason Bracelin at jbracelin@ reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0476.

ad-high_impact_4
Entertainment
Glittering Lights dazzles Las Vegas
The Glittering Lights holiday display is shining at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway. (Mat Luschek/ Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Skybar at Waldorf Astoria lets you sip your way through Las Vegas history
Skybar At Waldorf Astoria Lets You Sip Your Way Through Las Vegas History (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Stan Lee in Las Vegas for Madame Tussauds unveiling
Stan Lee Las Vegas speaks with the Review-Journal's Chris Lawrence about his love for his fans and shared universes. (Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Ultimate Belgium Waffle Sundae at Lavo
Lavo at the Palazzo serves a 16-scoop ice cream sundae that costs $800. (Rochelle Ricahrds, Janna Karel/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
A New Zip Line Is Opening On The Las Vegas Strip
A New Zip Line Is Opening On The Las Vegas Strip (Janna Karel lLas Vegas Review-Journal)
You'll need a keen eye to find this secret bar on the Las Vegas Strip
You'll need a keen eye to find this secret bar on the Las Vegas Strip (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
"The Lion King" roars into Las Vegas
New music club 172 brings loud luxury to Las Vegas
New music venue at the Rio brings rock ’n’ roll and food together at intimate club. K.M. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal
Fans fear for Zak Bagans’ safety in Las Vegas Halloween TV special
Fly Linq zip line time lapse
Fly Linq zip line timelapse
Shaq opens Las Vegas restaurant, Big Chicken
Shaq opens Las Vegas restaurant, Big Chicken
Robert Deniro And Chef Nobu Talk About The Success Of Nobu
Robert Deniro And Chef Nobu Talk About The Success Of Nobu (Al Mancini Las Vegas Review-journal)
Nevada Ballet Theatre rehearses for "Dracula" at The Smith Center
Nevada Ballet Theatre rehearses for "Dracula" at The Smith Center (Janna Karel/ Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Downtown Summerlin hosts its annual Festival of Arts
People crowd to Downtown Summerlin for the 23rd annual Summerlin Festival of Arts in Las Vegas, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018. (Caroline Brehman/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Bellagio, MGM Resorts International’s luxury hotel turns 20
The more than 3,000-room Bellagio hotel is situated on the site of the former Dunes Hotel. The Dunes was imploded in 1993, and construction of the Bellagio started in 1996. It cost $1.6 billion to build, making it the most expensive hotel in the world at the time. The Bellagio was former Wynn Resorts Ltd. Chairman and CEO Steve Wynn’s second major casino on the Strip after The Mirage. MGM Resorts International acquired the property from Steve Wynn in 2000. (Tara Mack/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Recycled Art and Cute Dogs at Summerlin Festival Of Arts
Recycled Art, Cute Dogs Abound At Summerlin Festival Of Arts (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Bellagio Patisserie Creates Life-size Sculpture Of 20th Anniversary Of Cirque Du Soleil Show
Bellagio Patisserie Creates Life-size Sculpture Of 20th Anniversary Of Cirque Du Soleil Show (Janna Karel/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
10 Most Iconic Moments At The Bellagio Fountains
10 Most Iconic Moments At The Bellagio Fountains (Janna Karel/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Jason Aldean talks about the possibility of a Las Vegas residency
Country superstar Jason Aldean discusses his feelings about playing in Las Vegas and says he'd be interested in a Las Vegas residency when the time is right at the iHeart Radio Music Festival in Las Vegas on September 21, 2018.(John Katsilometes/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Block 16 Urban Food Hall Serves Favorite Foods From Across The US
Block 16 Urban Food Hall Serves Favorite Foods From Across The US (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Benny the Skating Dog could be the next Golden Knights on-ice entertainment
Benny the Skating Dog could be the next Golden Knights on-ice entertainment (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Who To Watch At Life Is Beautiful
Life Is Beautiful Setup
Workers preparing Fremont street for this weekend's Life is Beautiful festival, on Wednesday, September 19, 2018. Mat Luschek/Las Vegas Review-Journal
The 46th annual Greek Food Festival will feed 25,000 people in Las Vegas
Madame Tussauds Has The Newest VR Experience On The Strip
Madame Tussauds Has The Newest VR Experience On The Strip. (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Zia Records Move
Zias Records is moving from its Sahara Avenue and Arville Street location to a bigger store. (Mat Luscheck/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Students At The International Contortion Convention In Las Vegas Learn How To Bend And Twist Their Bodies
Students At The International Contortion Convention In Las Vegas Learn How To Bend And Twist Their Bodies. (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
Video from Fertitta wedding Sep. 1
video from @wedstagrams of Fertitta wedding at Red Rock Resort
You Can Get Vegan Unicorn Toast In Downtown Las Vegas
You Can Get Vegan Unicorn Toast In Downtown Las Vegas (Janna Karel Las Vegas Review-Journal)
TOP NEWS
News Headlines
ad-infeed_1
ads_infeed_2
Local Spotlight
Add Event
Home Front Page Footer Listing
Circular
You May Like

You May Like