42°F
weather icon Clear

Clark County School District releases phase one of reopening plan

Clark County School District released phase one of its reopening plan Friday night, including specifics about remote summer school and bringing additional employees back to work.

Phase one won’t begin until Gov. Steve Sisolak lifts the stay-at-home order — currently in effect until May 15, Superintendent Jesus Jara said in a video statement.

“In anticipation of the Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak’s stay-at-home order being lifted, the Clark County School District (CCSD) has developed a phased approach to reopening CCSD facilities,” the school district said in a community FAQ document. “The plan’s focus is on protecting the health and safety of our employees and students, while slowly completing the tasks required for the long-term operation of our buildings.”

Sisolak announced April 21 that schools will remain closed for the rest of the school year, with distance learning continuing. The last day of school for CCSD campuses is May 20.

All CCSD facilities will remain closed to the general public during phase one, the district said.

The district also announced an extended school year program for students who have a disability, and summer school will be provided through distance education.

Parents who have a child in the extended school program will receive information by mail in late May, the district said in a Saturday post on Twitter.

Bringing employees back to work

In his video message, Jara thanked the district’s more than 42,000 employees for “their amazing commitment and dedication to our students and especially in the light of the challenges that COVID-19 has placed on our school system.”

Employees currently reporting to work to support essential CCSD functions will continue to do so, Jara said.

During phase one, “it can mean additional employees will be asked to report to physical worksites to begin the work needed to resume our operations,” according to a CCSD FAQ document for employees.

If possible, employees will be allowed to continue working from home, the district said. “However, there are some positions where telecommuting is infeasible due to the nature of the work.”

Staff with responsibilities that can’t be completed from home — such as the CCSD executive cabinet, custodians, and maintenance, transportation and grounds workers — will report to work, Jara said.

School principals will receive guidance of when it’s appropriate for them and their administrative teams to report back to school buildings, he said.

If employees who can’t telecommute aren’t comfortable with returning to work, they “may have the opportunity to explore available paid or unpaid leave options, depending upon their individual circumstances,” the district said.

For employees returning to a CCSD facility, supervisors must “develop shifts or other phased approaches,” the district said, to comply with social distancing. They must also come up with plan for common areas such as break rooms, restrooms and workrooms.

Employees will have the option of wearing a face mask, but it’s not required, the district said.

Five to seven days prior to phase one of reopening, supervisors are expected to contact their employees and review back-to-work expectations, Jara said. One to three days prior to reopening, supervisors must walk through work locations as an employee, he said. And on the first day back on the job, employees will attend a safety meeting.

CCSD employees should be aware phased reopening plans may change, Jara said, and should monitor email and other forms of district communication.

Contact Julie Wootton-Greener at jgreener@reviewjournal.com or 702-387-2921. Follow @julieswootton on Twitter.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST